The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) focuses on the development and innovative use of mathematical algorithms and models on high performance computers (HPC) to support basic and applied research and development across a wide spectrum of disciplines in science and engineering.

WHAT’S NEW

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

| Educational, Events, News | No Comments

Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided….

MICDE Fall 2016 Seminar Series speakers announced

| Educational, Events, General Interest, News | No Comments

The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is proud to announce its fall lineup of seminar speakers. In cooperation with academic departments across campus, the seminar series brings…

miRcore’s high school biotechnology camp a success

| Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

  From Aug. 8-12, 2016, MICDE and ARC-TS donated a Flux allocation and computational support to miRcore and its GIDAS’ Biotechnology Camp for high school students. All the students were able to log in the…

U-M team uses Flux HPC cluster for pre-surgery simulations

| Flux, General Interest, News | No Comments

Last summer, Alberto Figueroa’s BME lab at the University of Michigan achieved an important “first” – using computer-generated blood flow simulations to plan a complex cardiovascular procedure. “I believe this is…

MICDE Highlights

Data visualization

ConFlux

Combining Big Data and HPC

A new way of computing could lead to immediate advances in aerodynamics, climate science, cosmology, materials science and cardiovascular research.

The National Science Foundation will provide $2.42 million to develop a unique facility for refining complex, physics-based computer models with big data techniques at the University of Michigan. The university will provide an additional $1.04 million.

See the grant description and press release for more information.

Paul Zimmerman, Michael Cafarella and Honglak Lee named 2016 Sloan Fellows

MICDE faculty members Paul Zimmerman (Chemistry) and Michael Cafarella (Computer Science), and MIDAS faculty member Honglak Lee (Computer Science) have been awarded 2016 Sloan Research Fellowships, which seeks to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise.

Prof. Zimmerman’s research group develops and employs a broad spectrum of computational techniques to chemical problems.

Prof. Cafarella is a co-creator of Hadoop, the data processing system behind Yahoo, Twitter, and Facebook.

Prof. Lee’s research lies in machine learning and its applications to artificial intelligence.

For more information about the award see the press release.

Symposium Poster Winners

Three winners of the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Poster Competition, held at the MICDE Annual Symposium, were announced April 7, 2016.

They are:

First place – Elizabeth Hou, Statistics (A. Hero), LSA
“Latent Laplacian Maximum Entropy Discrimination for Detection of High-Utility Anomalies”

Second place – Doreen Fan and J. Brad Maeng, Aerospace (P. Roe), CoE
“Is there a better way to solve conservation laws?”

Third place – Rose Cersonsky, Macromolecular Science and Engineering (S. Glotzer), CoE
“Understanding Spatial Packing via Variable Shape”

Approximately 50 posters took part in the competition. The winners were chosen by a vote of symposium attendees.

Seeking HPC-related publications

Advanced Research Computing (ARC) maintains a list of journal and conference publications that involve the use of Flux and/or other research computing resources provided by Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services.

In order to keep this list up to date, we are asking investigators to submit publications from 2015 to the present by emailing Commmunications Manager Dan Meisler (dmeisler@umich.edu).

Animation of reducing the bottleneck effect

$5 million to widen ‘bottleneck to discovery’

An NSF grant will create a software-defined network between three Michigan universities

Buried in troves of data that scientists have gathered, but not yet analyzed, could be key insights to improving cancer treatment, understanding Alzheimer’s, predicting climate change effects and developing cheaper, clean energy technologies.

Those are just a few of the countless examples of fields where our capacity to gather scientific data now far exceeds our capacity to crunch it—especially when collaborations span the globe. Some research projects are producing the equivalent of 1,000 consumer hard drives a month, for example. Read more.

Featured Faculty Member


FIGUEROA_Alberto4x5-240x300 C. Alberto Figueroa
Associate Professor

Alberto Figueroa is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment in Biomedical Engineering and Surgery. He works on computational methods for patient-specific cardiovascular simulation. Modeling the function of the cardiovascular…