The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) focuses on the development and innovative use of mathematical algorithms and models on high performance computers (HPC) to support basic and applied research and development across a wide spectrum of disciplines in science and engineering.

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WHAT’S NEW

MICDE awards seven Catalyst Grants

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering has awarded its second round of Catalyst Grants, providing between $80,000 and $90,000 each to seven innovative projects in computational science. The…

CASC image competition open for submissions

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The image competition for the Coalition for Academic Scientific Computation (CASC) 2019 annual brochure is now open. Winning images will be featured in the brochure, which is distributed to industry,…

ARC-TS begins work on new “Great Lakes” cluster to replace Flux

| Flux, Happenings, HPC, News | No Comments
Advanced Research Computing - Technology Services (ARC-TS) is starting the process of creating a new, campus-wide computing cluster, “Great Lakes,” that will serve the broad needs of researchers across the…

Computational Data Science course accepting students for Fall 2018

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The course, instructed by Prof. Raj Rao Nadakuditi (EECS), is an in-depth introduction to computational methods for identifying, fitting, extracting and making sense of patterns in large data sets. Read more...

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MICDE Highlights

Data visualization

ConFlux

Combining Big Data and HPC

A new way of computing could lead to immediate advances in aerodynamics, climate science, cosmology, materials science and cardiovascular research.

The National Science Foundation will provide $2.42 million to develop a unique facility for refining complex, physics-based computer models with big data techniques at the University of Michigan. The university will provide an additional $1.04 million.

See the grant description and press release for more information.

Animation of reducing the bottleneck effect

$5 million to widen ‘bottleneck to discovery’

An NSF grant will create a software-defined network between three Michigan universities

Buried in troves of data that scientists have gathered, but not yet analyzed, could be key insights to improving cancer treatment, understanding Alzheimer’s, predicting climate change effects and developing cheaper, clean energy technologies.

Those are just a few of the countless examples of fields where our capacity to gather scientific data now far exceeds our capacity to crunch it—especially when collaborations span the globe. Some research projects are producing the equivalent of 1,000 consumer hard drives a month, for example. Read more.

2018 MICDE Symposium poster winners announced

The event featured approximately 50 posters

Yanming Wang, Chemistry; Sabrina Lynch, Biomedical Engineering; and Gregory Shallcross, Sarah Beetham, and Yuan Yao Mechanical Engineering, were the lead authors for posters that won the 2018 MICDE poster competition, held at the institute’s annual symposium in March.

Read more…

2017-18 Fellowships Awarded

Twenty graduate students were awarded MICDE Fellowships for the 2017-18 school year. The fellowships carry a $4,000 stipend. Another 10 students were given honorable mentions. Read more…

U-M joins NSF-funded SLATE project to simplify scientific collaboration on a massive scale

SLATE will enable creation of new platforms for collaborative science

Services Layer At The Edge (SLATE) is a $4 million project funded by the National Science Foundation, including University of Michigan in a team led by the Enrico Fermi and Computation Institutes at University of Chicago. SLATE will provide technology that simplifies connecting university and laboratory data center capabilities to the national cyberinfrastructure ecosystem. The University of Utah is also participating. Once installed, SLATE connects local research groups with their far-flung collaborators, allowing central research teams to automate the exchange of data, software and computing tasks among institutions without burdening local system administrators with installation and operation of highly customized scientific computing services.. Read more.

Featured Faculty Member


Trachette Jackson
Professor

Trachette L. Jackson is Full Professor in the Mathematics Department, who specializes in Computational Cancer Research or Mathematical Oncology.   A focus of Dr. Jackson’s research has been achieving a unified understanding…