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University of Michigan researcher contributes to NASA findings on carbon in the atmosphere showcased in the journal Science

By | General Interest, Happenings, News

 

High-resolution satellite data from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 are revealing the subtle ways that carbon links everything on Earth – the ocean, land, atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems and human activities. Scientists using the first 2 1/2 years of OCO-2 data have published a special collection of five papers today in the journal Science that demonstrates the breadth of this research. In addition to showing how drought and heat in tropical forests affected global carbon dioxide levels during the 2015-16 El Niño, other results from these papers focus on ocean carbon release and absorption, urban emissions and a new way to study photosynthesis. A final paper by OCO-2 Deputy Project Scientist Annmarie Eldering of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and colleagues gives an overview of the state of OCO-2 science.

Manish Verma, a Geospatial/Data Science Consultant at the University of Michigan’s Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research (CSCAR) unit, contributed as a coauthor to an article on a new way to measure photosynthesis over time and space.

Using data from the OCO-2, Verma’s analysis helped expand the utility of measurements of solar induced fluorescence (SIF), which indicates active photosynthesis in plants. Verma’s work showed that SIF data collected from the OCO-2 satellite provides reliable information on the variability of photosynthesis at a much smaller scale — down to individual ecosystems.

This can, in turn, “lead to more reliable estimates of carbon sources — that is, when, where, why and how carbon is exchanged between land and atmosphere — as well as a deeper understanding of carbon-climate feedbacks,” according to the Science article.

For more, see the NASA press release (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/new-insights-from-oco-2-showcased-in-science) and the Science article (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/358/6360/eaam5747.full)

The University of Michigan is live on IBM.com

By | News, Research

IBM is showcasing the current research developed with ConFlux, our ground-breaking cluster that uses IBM’s HPC and storage technology to enable scientists to draw on huge volumes of bid data and use machine learning to create reliable models for compute-intensive research.

“ With IBM hardware boosting our HPC environment, we can offer scientists the tools to conduct research that could revolutionize entire industries. ”
Todd Raeker, Research Technology Consultant for the University of Michigan.

To learn more please visit http://www-03.ibm.com/software/businesscasestudies/us/en/corp?synkey=A323848E50678F66

 

NVIDIA Grad Fellowship applications are open for the 2018-2019 academic year

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities

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NVIDIA just launched their 17th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program for the 2018-2019 academic year, which advances the frontiers of science by awarding grants and providing technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research. If you are or know of a student that uses ConFlux, please encourage them to apply as very few people have access to the types of GPUS available on Conflux, which might make their application more competitive.

This year they are especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in AI, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. NVIDIA’s Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2018-2019 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 140 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts. More importantly, this funding has helped some students achieve major breakthroughs in their research – breakthroughs that may not have been possible without additional funding.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. There is a new submission portal, and the deadlines for submissions are Dec. 13, 2017 (nomination letters) and Dec. 15, 2017 (applications). Students should be sure to start their application process early, as they use the portal to request their nomination letters in advance.

Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering, or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/graduate-fellowships or email fellowship@nvidia.com.