NVIDIA Grad Fellowship applications are open for the 2018-2019 academic year

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities | No Comments

image002

NVIDIA just launched their 17th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program for the 2018-2019 academic year, which advances the frontiers of science by awarding grants and providing technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research. If you are or know of a student that uses ConFlux, please encourage them to apply as very few people have access to the types of GPUS available on Conflux, which might make their application more competitive.

This year they are especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in AI, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. NVIDIA’s Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2018-2019 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 140 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts. More importantly, this funding has helped some students achieve major breakthroughs in their research – breakthroughs that may not have been possible without additional funding.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. There is a new submission portal, and the deadlines for submissions are Dec. 13, 2017 (nomination letters) and Dec. 15, 2017 (applications). Students should be sure to start their application process early, as they use the portal to request their nomination letters in advance.

Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering, or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/graduate-fellowships or email fellowship@nvidia.com.

Info sessions on graduate studies in computational and data sciences — Sept. 21 and 25

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, News, Research | No Comments

Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Times / Locations:

XSEDE Research Allocation Requests due July 15th

By | Educational, General Interest, HPC, News | No Comments

XSEDE Allocations award eligible users access to compute, visualization, and/or storage resources as well as extended support services.

XSEDE has various types of allocations from short term exploratory request to year long projects. In order to access to XSEDE resources you must have an allocation. Submit your allocation requests via the XSEDE Resource Allocation System (XRAS) in the XSEDE User Portal.

ARC-TS consultants can help researchers navigate the XSEDE resources and process. Contact them at hpc-support@umich.edu

MICDE announces 2017-2018 Fellowship recipients

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News | No Comments

MICDE is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017-2018 MICDE Fellowships for students enrolled in the PhD in Scientific Computing or the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering. We had 91 applicants from 25 departments representing 6 schools and colleges. Due to the extraordinary number of high quality applications we increased the number of fellowships from 15 to 20 awards. See our Fellowship page for more information.

AWARDEES

Diksha Dhawan, Chemistry
Negar Farzaneh, Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics
Kritika Iyer, Biomedical Engineering
Tibin John, Neuroscience
Bikash Kanungo, Mechanical Engineering
Yu-Han Kao, Epidemiology
Steven Kiyabu, Mechanical Engineering
Christiana Mavroyiakoumou, Mathematics
Ehsan Mirzakhalili, Mechanical Engineering
Colten Peterson, Climate and Space Sciences & Engineering
James Proctor, Materials Science & Engineering
Evan Rogers, Biomedical Engineering
Longxiu Tian, S. Ross School of Business
Jipu Wang, Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences
Yanming Wang, Chemistry
Zhenlin Wang, Mechanical Engineering
Alicia Welden, Chemistry
Anna White, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Chia-Nan Yeh, Physics
Yiling Zhang, Industrial & Operations Engineering

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Geunyeong Byeon, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Ayoub Gouasmi, Aerospace Engineering
Joseph Kleinhenz, Physics
Jia Li, Physics
Changjiang Liu, Biophysics
Vo Nguyen, Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics
Everardo Olide, Applied Physics
Qiyun Pan, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Pengchuan Wang, Civil & Environmental Engineering
Xinzhu Wei, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

U-M students invited to apply for MICDE fellowships — May 19 deadline

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities, General Interest, News | No Comments

University of Michigan students are invited to apply for Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Fellowships for the 2017-2018 academic year. These $4,000 fellowships are available to students in both the Ph.D in Scientific Computing and the Graduate Certificate Program in Computational Discovery and Engineering. Applicants should be graduate students enrolled in either program, although students not yet enrolled but planning to do so may simultaneously submit program and fellowship applications.

Fellows will receive a $4,000 research fund that can be used to attend a conference, to buy a computer, or for any other approved activity that enhances the Fellow’s graduate experience. We also ask that Fellows attend at least 8 MICDE seminars between Fall 2017 and Winter 2018, attend one MICDE students’ networking event, and present a poster at the MICDE Symposium on March 22, 2018. For more details and to apply please visit http://micde.umich.edu/academic-programs/micde-fellowships/.

Interested students should download and complete the application form, and submit it with a one-page resume as a SINGLE PDF DOCUMENT to MICDE-apps@umich.edu. The due date for applications is May 19, 2017, 5:00 E.T. We expect to announce the awardees onJune 5, 2017.

We encourage applications from all qualified candidates, including women and minorities.

MICDE Annual Symposium – Poster Competition Winners

By | Educational, Events, Research | No Comments

Fifty-six posters were submitted to the 2017 MICDE symposium poster competition.

Last week’s MICDE annual symposium included a poster competition for students and postdocs. The event featured 56 posters that highlighted the interdisciplinary nature of the institute. (Some of the posters were described in a story in the Michigan Daily). All of the titles and abstracts submitted are in this spreadsheet.

Victor Wu, Ph.D. Candidate in the department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, won first place and $500 for his poster “Multicriteria Optimization for Brachytherapy Treatment Planning.” Wu and co-authors Epelman, Sir, Pasupathy, Herman and Duefel, introduced an efficient Pareto-style planning approach and intuitive graphical user interface that enables a planner or physician to directly explore dose-volume histogram metric trade-offs for brachyotherapy treatment – a common method for treating cancer patients with radiation.

Sambit Das, Ph. D. Candidate of Mechanical Engineering, earned second place and a $250 prize for his work on “Large Scale Electronic Structure Studies on the Energetics of Dislocations in Al-Mg Materials System and Its Connection to Mesoscale Models

Third place, also with a $250 prize, went to Joseph Cicchese, Ph. D. Candidate in the Department of Chemical Engineering, for his poster titled “How to optimize tuberculosis antibiotic treatments using a computational granuloma model. Cicchese and co-authors Pienaar, Kirschner and Linderman, proposed a method of combining an agent-based and multi-scale model of tuberculosis granuloma formation and treatment with surrogate-assisted optimization to identify optimal tuberculosis treatments.

 

MIDAS starting research group on mobile sensor analytics

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, News | No Comments

The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) is convening a research working group on mobile sensor analytics. Mobile sensors are taking on an increasing presence in our lives. Wearable devices allow for physiological and cognitive monitoring, and behavior modeling for health maintenance, exercise, sports, and entertainment. Sensors in vehicles measure vehicle kinematics, record driver behavior, and increase perimeter awareness. Mobile sensors are becoming essential in areas such as environmental monitoring and epidemiological tracking.

There are significant data science opportunities for theory and application in mobile sensor analytics, including real-time data collection, streaming data analysis, active on-line learning, mobile sensor networks, and energy efficient mobile computing.

Our working group welcomes researchers with interest in mobile sensor analytics in any scientific domain, including but not limited to health, transportation, smart cities, ecology and the environment.

Where and When:

Noon to 2 pm, April 13, 2017

School of Public Health I, Room 7625

Lunch provided

Agenda:

  • Brief presentations about challenges and opportunities in mobile sensor analytics (theory and application);

  • A brief presentation of a list of funding opportunities;

  • Discussion of research ideas and collaboration in the context of grant application and industry partnership.

Future Plans: Based on the interest of participants, MIDAS will alert researchers to relevant funding opportunities, hold follow-up meetings for continued discussion and team formation as ideas crystalize for grant applications, and work with the UM Business Engagement Center to bring in industry partnership.

Please RSVP.  For questions, please contact Jing Liu, Ph.D, MIDAS research specialist (ljing@umich.edu; 734-764-2750).

Workshop co-chaired by MIDAS co-director Prof. Hero releases proceedings on inference in big data

By | Al Hero, Educational, General Interest, Research | No Comments

The National Academies Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics has released proceedings from its June 2016 workshop titled “Refining the Concept of Scientific Inference When Working with Big Data,” co-chaired by Alfred Hero, MIDAS co-director and the John H Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

The report can be downloaded from the National Academies website.

The workshop explored four key issues in scientific inference:

  • Inference about causal discoveries driven by large observational data
  • Inference about discoveries from data on large networks
  • Inference about discoveries based on integration of diverse datasets
  • Inference when regularization is used to simplify fitting of high-dimensional models.

The workshop brought together statisticians, data scientists and domain researchers from different biomedical disciplines in order to identify new methodological developments that hold significant promise, and to highlight potential research areas for the future. It was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge Program, and the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences.

Michigan Biological Software Team to compete at iGEM with MICDE support

By | Educational, General Interest, News, SC2 | No Comments

MICDE is pleased to announce its support of the Michigan Biological Software Team (MiBioSoft), for its attendance at the 2017 International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston.

Founded in 2014, MiBioSoft is a student-run organization at the University of Michigan that develops software for use in scientific research, with a focus on synthetic biology. It seeks to provide its members with opportunities to not only improve their skills as software designers, but also to improve their communication and management skills by bringing together students from a variety of backgrounds including Biology, Mathematics, Computer Science, and Chemistry.

MiBioSoft competes annually in the software track of the iGEM competition, where research teams from around the world present their results over the course of a three-day conference. During the first two years at the competition, the team was awarded bronze medals. In 2016, MiBioSoft received Best Software Project award as well as a gold medal for their protocol catalog, ProtoCat, in a competition that featured over 300 teams from more than 40 countries, with more than 5,000 participants in total.

About Protocat

Protocat is protocol catalog software developed by MiBioSoft students to address the issue of reproducibility in synthetic biology. Like many innovative ideas, it began because of a problem. Studies have estimated that only 10-25% of published scientific results are reproducible. A 2014 survey conducted by the Michigan Software team confirmed that the repeatability problem exists in synthetic biology, with every scientist surveyed reporting prior struggles with replicating protocols.

ProtoCat 3.0 is a free database of crowd-sourced protocols designed to make existing protocols more repeatable and enable more accurate computational models of biological systems. MiBioSoft believes this can most efficiently be accomplished with a commitment to open source protocols and a broader more active community of digital troubleshooters. ProtoCat 3.0 works to establish such a community by giving anyone with an internet connection or smartphone access to a repository of synthetic biology protocols collected from all over the world. Additionally, ProtoCat 3.0 encourages the development of higher quality, more repeatable protocols by allowing users to document, rate, review, and edit existing methods.