MICDE Annual Symposium – Poster Competition Winners

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Fifty-six posters were submitted to the 2017 MICDE symposium poster competition.

Last week’s MICDE annual symposium included a poster competition for students and postdocs. The event featured 56 posters that highlighted the interdisciplinary nature of the institute. (Some of the posters were described in a story in the Michigan Daily). All of the titles and abstracts submitted are in this spreadsheet.

Victor Wu, Ph.D. Candidate in the department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, won first place and $500 for his poster “Multicriteria Optimization for Brachytherapy Treatment Planning.” Wu and co-authors Epelman, Sir, Pasupathy, Herman and Duefel, introduced an efficient Pareto-style planning approach and intuitive graphical user interface that enables a planner or physician to directly explore dose-volume histogram metric trade-offs for brachyotherapy treatment – a common method for treating cancer patients with radiation.

Sambit Das, Ph. D. Candidate of Mechanical Engineering, earned second place and a $250 prize for his work on “Large Scale Electronic Structure Studies on the Energetics of Dislocations in Al-Mg Materials System and Its Connection to Mesoscale Models

Third place, also with a $250 prize, went to Joseph Cicchese, Ph. D. Candidate in the Department of Chemical Engineering, for his poster titled “How to optimize tuberculosis antibiotic treatments using a computational granuloma model. Cicchese and co-authors Pienaar, Kirschner and Linderman, proposed a method of combining an agent-based and multi-scale model of tuberculosis granuloma formation and treatment with surrogate-assisted optimization to identify optimal tuberculosis treatments.

 

MIDAS starting research group on mobile sensor analytics

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The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) is convening a research working group on mobile sensor analytics. Mobile sensors are taking on an increasing presence in our lives. Wearable devices allow for physiological and cognitive monitoring, and behavior modeling for health maintenance, exercise, sports, and entertainment. Sensors in vehicles measure vehicle kinematics, record driver behavior, and increase perimeter awareness. Mobile sensors are becoming essential in areas such as environmental monitoring and epidemiological tracking.

There are significant data science opportunities for theory and application in mobile sensor analytics, including real-time data collection, streaming data analysis, active on-line learning, mobile sensor networks, and energy efficient mobile computing.

Our working group welcomes researchers with interest in mobile sensor analytics in any scientific domain, including but not limited to health, transportation, smart cities, ecology and the environment.

Where and When:

Noon to 2 pm, April 13, 2017

School of Public Health I, Room 7625

Lunch provided

Agenda:

  • Brief presentations about challenges and opportunities in mobile sensor analytics (theory and application);

  • A brief presentation of a list of funding opportunities;

  • Discussion of research ideas and collaboration in the context of grant application and industry partnership.

Future Plans: Based on the interest of participants, MIDAS will alert researchers to relevant funding opportunities, hold follow-up meetings for continued discussion and team formation as ideas crystalize for grant applications, and work with the UM Business Engagement Center to bring in industry partnership.

Please RSVP.  For questions, please contact Jing Liu, Ph.D, MIDAS research specialist (ljing@umich.edu; 734-764-2750).

Graduate Studies in Computational & Data Sciences Info Session — Jan 9 & 11

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Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources

There will be two sessions in January 2017:

Info Session: Data Science Services at U-M — Nov. 1

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Representatives of Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research (CSCAR) and the U-M Library (UML) will give an overview of services that are now available to support data-intensive research on campus.  As part of the U-M Data Science Initiative, CSCAR and UML are expanding their scopes and adding capacity to support a wide range of research involving data and computation.  This includes consulting, workshops, and training designed to meet basic and advanced needs in data management and analysis, as well as specialized support for areas such as remote sensing and geospatial analyses, and a funding program for dataset acquisitions.  Many of these services are available free of charge to U-M researchers.  

This event will begin with overview presentations about CSCAR and Library system data services.  There will also be opportunities for researchers to discuss individualized partnerships with CSCAR and UML to advance specific data-intensive projects.  Faculty, staff, and students are welcome to attend.  

Time/Date: 4-5 p.m., November 1,
Location: Earl Lewis Room, Rackham Building

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

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Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided.

Two sessions are scheduled:

Monday, Sept. 19, 5 – 6 p.m.
Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 – 6 p.m.
2001 LSA Building (Central Campus)

The sessions will address:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing, which is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

MICDE Fall 2016 Seminar Series speakers announced

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is proud to announce its fall lineup of seminar speakers. In cooperation with academic departments across campus, the seminar series brings nationally recognized speakers to campus.

This fall’s speakers are:

Sept. 13: Nathan Kutz, Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Washington

Sept. 22: Rob Gardner, Senior Scientist at the Computation Institute, University of Chicago

Sept. 29: Jeremy Lichstein, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Florida

Oct. 6: Jonathan Freund, Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering and of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Oct. 14: Anthony Wachs, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia

Oct. 26: Andrea Lodi, Professor of Mathematical and Industrial Engineering, Polytechnique Montreal

Nov. 11: David Higdon, Professor of the Biocomplexity Institute, Virginia Tech

Dec. 9: Ann Almgren, Staff Scientist at the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories

For more information, including links to bios and abstracts as available, please visit micde.umich.edu/seminar-series/.

Students in the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering program are required to attend at least half of the seminars.

Registration open for on-campus telecast of XSEDE workshop on MPI — Sept. 7-8

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U-M is hosting a telecast of a workshop on MPI (message passing interface) presented by XSEDE and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to MPI programming. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using MPI – the standard programming tool of scalable parallel computing.

Time/Date: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern, Wednesday, Sept. 7 and Thursday, Sept. 8

Location: Room B003E, North Campus Research Complex (NCRC), Building 16, 2800 Plymouth Rd.

Registration: Registration is required through the XSEDE website (you must create an XSEDE user account to register). Space is limited.

More information: Class website.

Contact: Simon Adorf (csadorf@umich.edu)

Software Carpentry workshop at U-M — May 2-3

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A Software Carpentry workshop will be held at the U-M Medical School May 2 and 3. These workshops are free and open to anyone on campus; the sessions are suitable for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. Register here.

This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students, postdocs, and other researchers across the University of Michigan. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Where: Furstenberg 2710 (2nd floor of Med Sci II).

Midwest Big Data Hub offers early career seed funding to improve data access — April 1, May 1 deadlines

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The Midwest Big Data Hub, an NSF-funded group including U-M’s Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS), is seeking proposals from early career researchers to enhance collaborations with data-producing organizations to improve access to data. Senior researchers are also welcome to apply for funding for activities that bring together data producers and researchers with significant participation from early career researchers.

The goal of the funding, provided by the Computing Community Consortium, is to improve partnerships and collaboration between data producing organizations in industry, government, and academia and researchers. Activities can include workshops, internships, hackathons at universities, data-related competitions, travel grants and lecture series. Awards will range from between $10,000 and $40,000.

Deadlines for applications are April 1 and May 1.

For more information, including how to apply, read the proposal description on the MIDAS website.