MIDAS hosting Data Science Summer Camp for high school students

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The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) is hosting a data science summer camp for juniors and seniors in high school, from July 18 – 22, 2016.

Students in the camp, titled “From Simple Building Blocks to Complex Shapes: A Visual Tour of Fourier Series” will create art, diagnose disease, and play detective using the Fourier Series. Students will learn the basic mathematics behind Fourier series and use them to tackle data science problems by starting with simple building blocks and scaling up the complexity. Click to watch our preview video.

Any high school student can apply, with a special focus on Juniors and Seniors. Interest in mathematics and art is strongly encouraged; experience with trigonometry recommended. The camp will be full day, and attendance is expected all five days. Contact the organizers at midas-camp@umich.edu  or visit the camp’s website for more information.

HPC outage due to power maintenance, Saturday, April 2

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The Modular Data Center, which houses the Flux HPC cluster, will be without power starting from 6 a.m. to approximately 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 2, for preventative maintenance of electrical infrastructure on North Campus.  Additional networking maintenance for campus storage systems is going to start at 11pm Saturday night at the Administrative Services Building machine room which will also impact the HPC clusters.

Therefore, we expect Flux, Armis, /scratch and transfer hosts to be out of service from 6 a.m. until at least midnight.

During the outage, annual preventative maintenance on the MDC will also take place. ARC-TS will also take advantage of the outage to install firmware updates to our new InfiniBand switch.

We will update the outage schedule as needed on Twitter at @ARCTS_UM.

REMINDER: Info Sessions: Graduate programs in computational and data science — Feb. 22, 23

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Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields, and enjoy some pizza. Presentations will describe the following programs:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics: 1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications; 2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization; 3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Monday, February 22, 5-6 p.m., Room 2001, LS&A Building, 500 State St. 

Tuesday, February 23, 5-6 p.m., EECS 1200, 1301 Beal Ave. 

Presenters:

  • Krishna Garikipati, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics, and Associate Director for Research, Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering.
  • Ivo Dinov, Associate Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Human Behavior and Biological Sciences.
  • Ken Powell, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Aerospace Engineering.

There will be time for questions and discussion.

MICDE Seminar: Jim Belak, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, “Bridging Scales within Exascale Materials Co-design Center” — Feb. 5

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As part of the MICDE Seminar Series, Jim Belak of the Materials Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will speak on campus Friday, Feb. 5.

Abstract: The advent of Advanced / Additive Manufacturing and the Materials Genome Initiative has placed significant emphasis on accelerating the qualification of new materials for use in real applications. Within these workflows lies both the engineering scale qualification through building and testing components at scale and full-scale modeling with integrated continuum computer codes and the materials scale qualification through revolutionary methods to non-destructively measure microstructure (3DXRD) and physics specific experiments coupled with meso-scale mechanics simulations of the same physics specific experiment using the same microstructure. This ICME process is one of the use cases that drives the Exascale Materials Co-design Center (ExMatEx). The goal of the Co-design Center is very analogous to the acceleration of new materials deployment within the MGI, rather co-design accelerates the deploying of laboratory concepts for future computer components to enable a productive exascale computer system. To enable better meso-scale understanding in the continuum models, ExMatEx is creating a direct coupling between the continuum integrated code and direct numerical simulation of the meso-scale phenomena. Here we review the ExMatEx project, and its use cases.

Bio: Jim Belak is an Applied Scientist in the Materials Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His career has centered around the application of High Performance Computing to equilibrium and non-equilibrium problems in Condensed Matter Physics, including: order-disorder phase transition in solids; indentation, metal cutting and tribology of interfaces; shock propagation and spallation fracture; structure and dynamics of grain boundaries and defects in solids; and kinetics of phase evolution in extreme environments. These applications have required the development of new algorithms and application codes for emerging high performance parallel computers and the use of novel x-ray synchrotron techniques (3D x-ray tomography and small-angle x-ray scattering) to guide and validate the simulations. Currently, Jim co-leads the Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx).

MIDAS Seminar: Kevin Ward, Executive Director, Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care, “Data in Motion Phenotyping” — Feb. 5

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MIDAS is proud to announce that Kevin Ward, Professor of Emergency Medicine and Executive Director of the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care, and Fast Forward Medical Innovation, will speak at 4 p.m., Feb. 5, 2016, in the Michigan League Ballroom, as part of the MIDAS Seminar Series. All seminars are streamed live (sign in as Guest).

CSCAR Data Science Skills Series adds session on Pandas case studies — Feb. 17

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CSCAR is offering a series of workshops on data science skills using Python. The workshops will be held in the Earl Lewis room in the Rackham building. All workshops will take place on Wednesday afternoons from 3:30-5.

No registration is necessary and there is no fee to attend. Please note: A new section has been added on Pandas case studies.

Schedule:

  • January 27: Data management with Pandas
  • February 10: Graphics and data visualization with Matplotlib and Bokeh
  • NEW: February 17: Pandas case studies (CMS data analyses)
  • February 24: Basic statistical analysis with Statsmodels
  • March 9: Sklearn for predictive analysis and data exploration
  • March 23: Advanced regression analysis (GEE, mixed models and multiple imputation) with Statsmodels
  • April 6: Survival analysis with Statsmodels

Additional workshops will be scheduled on the following topics, dates to be announced:

  • Geospatial analysis
  • Building and accessing databases
  • MPI, parallel, and distributed computing

Class material will be posted on the series website.

Save the Date: MICDE Symposium, April 7

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Annual Symposium will take place April 7 in the Rackham Building on U-M’s Central Campus.

Titled “Towards Tomorrow’s Computational Science,” the symposium will feature an outstanding group of speakers, including the director of NSF’s Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure, Irene Qualters; 2016 SIAM awardee Linda Petzold (UCSB); AMS/SIAM Norbert Wiener Prize winner James Sethian (Berkeley); and MathWorks co-founder and Matlab author Cleve Moler.

The symposium will also include a poster session highlighting outstanding computational work from U-M researchers and students. To participate in the poster session, contact Mariana Carrasco-Teja.

More information, including a detailed agenda, will be posted on the MICDE website as it becomes available.

MIDAS Seminar: Goncalo Abecasis, U-M Dept. of Biostatistics — Jan. 22

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As part of the Michigan Institute for Data Science) Seminar Series, Goncalo Abecasis, Felix E. Moore Collegiate Professor and Chair of the Department of Biostatistics, will give a talk titled “Sequencing 10,000s of Human Genomes: Early Results, Opportunities and Challenges.”

Time/Date: 4 – 5:30 p.m., Friday, Jan. 22

Location: Forum Hall, Palmer Commons

Abstract: Rapid advances in genome sequencing technology are enabling increasingly detailed analysis of human genetic variation. In the next year, we expect to analyze >50,000 deeply sequenced human genomes, corresponding to ~10 million billion bases of raw sequence data.

The generation, transfer and analysis of the data presents many opportunities for scientific discovery – enabling better understanding of human history, biology and disease. It also presents varied computational and analytical challenges as well as opportunities to develop and implement new modes of data sharing.

I will illustrate these challenges and opportunities with examples from our ongoing studies.

Bio: My research focuses on using human genetics to improve our understanding of human health and disease. To advance human genetic studies, my group develops statistical and computational methods that enable geneticists to apply emerging high-throughput technologies to studies of human health and disease. Over the past 15 years, I have developed computational tools, analytical models and study designs that have facilitated the widespread deployment of array-based genotyping and short read sequencing technologies in human genetic studies. My research is highly collaborative and benefits from interactions with experts in statistics and biostatistics, biology and human genetics, computer science and mathematics. I have mentored 11 doctoral students and ten postdoctoral research fellows, of whom 14 are now on the faculty at major research universities in the United States.

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Workshops: Data Science Skills Series (Python) — Jan. 27 through April 6

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CSCAR will offer a series of workshops on data science skills using Python. The workshops will be held in the Earl Lewis room in the Rackham building. All workshops will take place on Wednesday afternoons from 3:30-5.

The workshops are free and no registration is necessary.

Schedule:

  • January 27: Data management with Pandas
  • February 10: Graphics and data visualization with Matplotlib and Bokeh
  • February 24: Basic statistical analysis with Statsmodels
  • March 9: Sklearn for predictive analysis and data exploration
  • March 23: Advanced regression analysis (GEE, mixed models and multiple imputation) with Statsmodels
  • April 6: Survival analysis with Statsmodels

Additional workshops will be scheduled on the following topics, dates to be announced:

  • Geospatial analysis
  • Building and accessing databases
  • MPI, parallel, and distributed computing

Class material will be posted on the series website.

MICDE Seminar: James Stone, Astrophysical Science, Princeton — Jan. 28

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We regret that this talk has been cancelled due to the snowstorm on the east coast.

James Stone, Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, will speak on campus as part of the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Seminar Series.

Title: Global Radiation MHD Simulations of Black Hole Accretion Disks

Time/Date/Location: CANCELLED

Abstract: New results from a study of the magnetohydrodynamics of luminous accretion flows around black holes will be presented. In this regime, radiation pressure dominates the flow, thus the calculations require numerical methods based on a formal solution of the time-dependent radiation transfer equation. In this talk Prof. Stone will describe new algorithms he has developed that eliminate the need for approximate closures. He and his colleagues found that turbulent transport of radiation energy can be a significant contribution to the cooling rate in the disk, and this changes the global properties of the flow compared to standard thin-disk models. He will describe new work to extend the calculations to full general relativity, in order to follow the dynamics in the innermost regions of the disk.

Bio: James Stone is a Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. His research centers on the use of large-scale direct numerical simulations to study the gas dynamics of a wide range of astrophysical systems, from protostars to clusters of galaxies. Almost all of this work requires development of advanced numerical algorithms for astrophysical gas dynamics on modern parallel computer systems. He is one of the primary developers of the ZEUS code for astrophysical MHD, and more recently he and his collaborators developed Athena, a high-order Godunov scheme for astrophysical MHD that uses adaptive mesh refinement (AMR).

Some of the research problems on which he works include: (1) hydrodynamic and MHD processes that can lead to outward angular momentum transport in accretion disks, (2) the production and propagation of highly supersonic, collimated jets from accretion disks around protostars and active galactic nuclei, (3) the properties of compressible MHD turbulence in cold molecular gas in the galaxy, (4) the time-dependent evolution of strong shocks in the interstellar medium, (5) the structure of radiatively driven winds and outflows from disks around hot stars and AGN, and (6) the effect of mergers and AGN feedback on the hot x-ray emitting gas in clusters of galaxies.

Prof. Stone has a joint appointment in the Program in Applied and Computation Mathematics (PACM). He is deeply involved in PICSciE, which provides access to high-performance computing systems on Princeton’s campus, and training and education in scientific computation and numerical analysis.