CSCAR provides walk-in support for new Flux users

By | Data, Educational, Flux, General Interest, HPC, News

CSCAR now provides walk-in support during business hours for students, faculty, and staff seeking assistance in getting started with the Flux computing environment.  CSCAR consultants can walk a researcher through the steps of applying for a Flux account, installing and configuring a terminal client, connecting to Flux, basic SSH and Unix command line, and obtaining or accessing allocations.  

In addition to walk-in support, CSCAR has several staff consultants with expertise in advanced and high performance computing who can work with clients on a variety of topics such as installing, optimizing, and profiling code.  

Support via email is also provided via hpc-support@umich.edu.  

CSCAR is located in room 3550 of the Rackham Building (915 E. Washington St.). Walk-in hours are from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for noon – 1 p.m. on Tuesdays.

See the CSCAR web site (cscar.research.umich.edu) for more information.

ARC-TS seeks input on next generation HPC cluster

By | Events, Flux, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

The University of Michigan is beginning the process of building our next generation HPC platform, “Big House.”  Flux, the shared HPC cluster, has reached the end of its useful life. Flux has served us well for more than five years, but as we move forward with replacement, we want to make sure we’re meeting the needs of the research community.

ARC-TS will be holding a series of town halls to take input from faculty and researchers on the next HPC platform to be built by the University.  These town halls are open to anyone and will be held at:

  • College of Engineering, Johnson Room, Tuesday, June 20th, 9:00a – 10:00a
  • NCRC Bldg 300, Room 376, Wednesday, June 21st, 11:00a – 12:00p
  • LSA #2001, Tuesday, June 27th, 10:00a – 11:00a
  • 3114 Med Sci I, Wednesday, June 28th, 2:00p – 3:00p

Your input will help to ensure that U-M is on course for providing HPC, so we hope you will make time to attend one of these sessions. If you cannot attend, please email hpc-support@umich.edu with any input you want to share.

[SC2] HPC resources available to U-M students

By | Educational, Flux, SC2

Brock Palen, Associate Director of Advanced Research Computing-Technology Services, joined the SC2 to talk about all the high performance computing (HPC) resources available to U-M graduate and undergraduate students. A summary of his presentation is here.

Resources:

Available at/through Michigan

  1. Flux for Undergraduates: Undergraduates can use the local flux computing cluster FOR FREE! Please visit the page for more information
    • ARC-Connect: use for Jupyter notebooks and VNC (remote desktop) access of flux resources, useful for remote visualization of big data or just getting a feel for working on linux and flux.
  2. Amazon Web Services: Michigan students get $100/year in amazon web services. While not as cost-effective for some things, very good resource to be aware of.
  3. Hadoop: Michigan’s Hadoop cluster is available for free (I believe you have to apply/demonstrate a need, but you don’t have to pay if it’s accepted). This upcoming workshop will go over the basics, read more if you are interested.

Available via Grant

Brock has an up-to-date webpage linking to and detailing various resources you can apply for.

Highlights:
  1. XSEDE:
    • Startup and teaching allocations are available continuously
    • Research allocations accepts 4x/year
  2. Great Lakes Consortium:
    • Alternate way to get some time on Blue Waters
  3. Amazon/Microsoft/Google:

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U-M team uses Flux HPC cluster for pre-surgery simulations

By | Flux, General Interest, News

Last summer, Alberto Figueroa’s BME lab at the University of Michigan achieved an important “first” – using computer-generated blood flow simulations to plan a complex cardiovascular procedure.

“I believe this is the first time that virtual surgical planning was done for real and not as a retrospective theoretical exercise ,” says Figueroa.

Using a patient’s medical and imaging data, Figueroa was able to create a model of her unique vasculature and blood flow, then use it to guide U-M pediatric cardiologists Aimee Armstrong, Martin Bocks, and Adam Dorfman in placing a graft in her inferior vena cava to help alleviate complications from pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The simulations were done using the Flux HPC cluster.

Read more…