[SC2] HPC resources available to U-M students

By | Educational, Flux, SC2 | No Comments

Brock Palen, Associate Director of Advanced Research Computing-Technology Services, joined the SC2 to talk about all the high performance computing (HPC) resources available to U-M graduate and undergraduate students. A summary of his presentation is here.

Resources:

Available at/through Michigan

  1. Flux for Undergraduates: Undergraduates can use the local flux computing cluster FOR FREE! Please visit the page for more information
    • ARC-Connect: use for Jupyter notebooks and VNC (remote desktop) access of flux resources, useful for remote visualization of big data or just getting a feel for working on linux and flux.
  2. Amazon Web Services: Michigan students get $100/year in amazon web services. While not as cost-effective for some things, very good resource to be aware of.
  3. Hadoop: Michigan’s Hadoop cluster is available for free (I believe you have to apply/demonstrate a need, but you don’t have to pay if it’s accepted). This upcoming workshop will go over the basics, read more if you are interested.

Available via Grant

Brock has an up-to-date webpage linking to and detailing various resources you can apply for.

Highlights:
  1. XSEDE:
    • Startup and teaching allocations are available continuously
    • Research allocations accepts 4x/year
  2. Great Lakes Consortium:
    • Alternate way to get some time on Blue Waters
  3. Amazon/Microsoft/Google:

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U-M team uses Flux HPC cluster for pre-surgery simulations

By | Flux, General Interest, News | No Comments

Last summer, Alberto Figueroa’s BME lab at the University of Michigan achieved an important “first” – using computer-generated blood flow simulations to plan a complex cardiovascular procedure.

“I believe this is the first time that virtual surgical planning was done for real and not as a retrospective theoretical exercise ,” says Figueroa.

Using a patient’s medical and imaging data, Figueroa was able to create a model of her unique vasculature and blood flow, then use it to guide U-M pediatric cardiologists Aimee Armstrong, Martin Bocks, and Adam Dorfman in placing a graft in her inferior vena cava to help alleviate complications from pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The simulations were done using the Flux HPC cluster.

Read more…