U-M plans participation at SC17 conference in Denver

By | General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

Several University of Michigan researchers and professional IT staff will attend the Supecomputing 17 (SC17) conference in Colorado from Nov. 12-17, and participate in a number of different ways, including demonstrations, presentations and tutorials.

In addition to the events and presentations listed below, Amy Liebowitz, a network architect at ITS, is working on SCINet, a high-capacity network created every year for the conference. Liebowitz is on the routing team, which is responsible for installing, configuring and supporting the high performance conference network. The Routing Team also coordinates external connectivity with commodity Internet and R&E WAN service providers.

Please visit us at Booth 471 on the exhibit floor, or at one of the following events:

Sunday, Nov. 12

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.: Quentin Stout (EECS) and Christiane Jablonowski (CLASP) will teach the “Parallel Computing 101” tutorial.

Tuesday, Nov. 14

10:30 a.m.:  Research Networking at the University of Michigan
Eric Boyd, Director of Research Networks, U-M
U-M Booth #471

11 a.m.: The OSiRIS Project: Open Storage Research Infrastructure
Ben Meekhof, HPC Storage Administrator, Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS)
U-M Booth #471

12:30 p.m.: GPU-Accelerated Predictive Material Design
Simon Adorf, Ph.D. Candidate, Chemical Engineering Department, U-M
U-M Booth #471

1:30 p.m.: Simple Data and Workflow Management with Signac
Simon Adorf, Ph.D. Candidate, Chemical Engineering Department, U-M
U-M Booth #471

1:30 – 3 p.m.: Matt McLean, a Big Data systems administrator with ARC-TS, will serve as a panelist at a presentation titled “The ARM Software Ecosystem: Are We There Yet?

2 p.m.: The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering
Mariana Carrasco-Teja, Assistant Director, MICDE
U-M Booth #471

5:15 – 7 p.m.: Jeff Sica, a research database administrator with ARC-TS, will help lead a Birds of a Feather session titled “Containers in HPC.”

6:15 – 8:30 p.m.: ARC at U-M is a sponsor of a networking and career networking reception put on by Women in HPC. ARC Director Sharon Broude Geva will speak at the event.

Wednesday, November 15

10 a.m.: The OSiRIS Project: Open Storage Research Infrastructure
Shawn McKee, U-M Department of Physics, OSiRIS Principal Investigator
U-M Booth #471

11 a.m.: Research Networking at the University of Michigan
Eric Boyd, Director of Research Networks, U-M
U-M Booth #471

3 p.m.: The New Cavium ThunderX Big Data Cluster at U-M
Matt McLean, Big Data Systems Administrator, ARC-TS
U-M Booth #471

Thursday, November 16

11 a.m.: The New Cavium ThunderX Big Data Cluster at U-M
Matt McLean, Big Data Systems Administrator, ARC-TS
U-M Booth #471

 

 

U-M partners with Cavium on Big Data computing platform

By | Feature, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

A new partnership between the University of Michigan and Cavium Inc., a San Jose-based provider of semiconductor products, will create a powerful new Big Data computing cluster available to all U-M researchers.

The $3.5 million ThunderX computing cluster will enable U-M researchers to, for example, process massive amounts of data generated by remote sensors in distributed manufacturing environments, or by test fleets of automated and connected vehicles.

The cluster will run the Hortonworks Data Platform providing Spark, Hadoop MapReduce and other tools for large-scale data processing.

“U-M scientists are conducting groundbreaking research in Big Data already, in areas like connected and automated transportation, learning analytics, precision medicine and social science. This partnership with Cavium will accelerate the pace of data-driven research and opening up new avenues of inquiry,” said Eric Michielssen, U-M associate vice president for advanced research computing and the Louise Ganiard Johnson Professor of Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

“I know from experience that U-M researchers are capable of amazing discoveries. Cavium is honored to help break new ground in Big Data research at one of the top universities in the world,” said Cavium founder and CEO Syed Ali, who received a master of science in electrical engineering from U-M in 1981.

Cavium Inc. is a leading provider of semiconductor products that enable secure and intelligent processing for enterprise, data center, wired and wireless networking. The new U-M system will use dual socket servers powered by Cavium’s ThunderX ARMv8-A workload optimized processors.

The ThunderX product family is Cavium’s 64-bit ARMv8-A server processor for next generation Data Center and Cloud applications, and features high performance custom cores, single and dual socket configurations, high memory bandwidth and large memory capacity.

Alec Gallimore, the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering at U-M, said the Cavium partnership represents a milestone in the development of the College of Engineering and the university.

“It is clear that the ability to rapidly gain insights into vast amounts of data is key to the next wave of engineering and science breakthroughs. Without a doubt, the Cavium platform will allow our faculty and researchers to harness the power of Big Data, both in the classroom and in their research,” said Gallimore, who is also the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor, an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, and a professor both of aerospace engineering and of applied physics.

Along with applications in fields like manufacturing and transportation, the platform will enable researchers in the social, health and information sciences to more easily mine large, structured and unstructured datasets. This will eventually allow, for example, researchers to discover correlations between health outcomes and disease outbreaks with information derived from socioeconomic, geospatial and environmental data streams.

U-M and Cavium chose to run the cluster on Hortonworks Data Platform, which is based on open source Apache Hadoop. The ThunderX cluster will deliver high performance computer services for the Hadoop analytics and, ultimately, a total of three petabytes of storage space.

“Hortonworks is excited to be a part of forward-leading research at the University of Michigan exploring low-powered, high-performance computing,” said Nadeem Asghar, vice president and global head of technical alliances at Hortonworks. “We see this as a great opportunity to further expand the platform and segment enablement for Hortonworks and the ARM community.”

CSCAR provides walk-in support for new Flux users

By | Data, Educational, Flux, General Interest, HPC, News

CSCAR now provides walk-in support during business hours for students, faculty, and staff seeking assistance in getting started with the Flux computing environment.  CSCAR consultants can walk a researcher through the steps of applying for a Flux account, installing and configuring a terminal client, connecting to Flux, basic SSH and Unix command line, and obtaining or accessing allocations.  

In addition to walk-in support, CSCAR has several staff consultants with expertise in advanced and high performance computing who can work with clients on a variety of topics such as installing, optimizing, and profiling code.  

Support via email is also provided via hpc-support@umich.edu.  

CSCAR is located in room 3550 of the Rackham Building (915 E. Washington St.). Walk-in hours are from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for noon – 1 p.m. on Tuesdays.

See the CSCAR web site (cscar.research.umich.edu) for more information.

Computational Science around U-M: Ph.D. Candidate Shannon Moran (Chemical Engineering) has won an ACM SIGHPC Intel Fellowship

By | Happenings, HPC, Uncategorized

Moran_HighRes_SqShannon Moran, a Ph.D. Candidate in the department of Chemical Engineering, has won a 2017 SIGHPC Intel Fellowship. Shannon is a member of the Glotzer Group. They use computer simulation to discover the fundamental principles of how nanoscale systems of building blocks self-assemble, and to discover how to control the assembly process to engineer new materials.

ACM’s Special Interest Group on High Performance Computing is an international group with a major professional society that is devoted to the needs of students, faculty, researchers and practitioners in high performance computing. This year they awarded 12 fellowships around the country with the aim of increasing the diversity of students pursuing graduate degrees in data science and computational science, including women as well as students from racial/ethnic backgrounds that have been historically underrepresented in the computing field. The fellowship provides $15,000 annually for study anywhere in the world.

The fellowship is funded by Intel and is presented at the annual Super Computing conference that this year will take place in November 13-16 in Denver, Colorado.

MICDE sponsored miRcore Biotechnology Summer Camp for the second year in a row

By | Happenings, HPC, Uncategorized

miRcoreBioTec2017This year’s miRcore’s Biotechnology summer camp was a big success.  The participants had hands-on experience in a wet-lab, and with the UNIX command line while accessing U-M’s High Performance Computing cluster, Flux, in a research setting. For the second year in a row MICDE and ARC-ts sponsored the campers to access Flux as they learned the steps that are needed to run code in a computer cluster. The camp also combined theoretical thermodynamic practices that gave participants an overall research experience in nucleotide biotechnology.

miRcore’s camps are designed to expose high school students to career opportunities in biomedicine and to provide research opportunities beyond the classroom setting. For more information please visit http://www.mircore.org/summer-camps/.

New Data Science Computing Platform Available to U-M Researchers

By | General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS) is pleased to announce an expanded data science computing platform, giving all U-M researchers new capabilities to host structured and unstructured databases, and to ingest, store, query and analyze large datasets.

The new platform features a flexible, robust and scalable database environment, and a set of data pipeline tools that can ingest and process large amounts of data from sensors, mobile devices and wearables, and other sources of streaming data. The platform leverages the advanced virtualization capabilities of ARC-TS’s Yottabyte Research Cloud (YBRC) infrastructure, and is supported by U-M’s Data Science Initiative launched in 2015. YBRC was created through a partnership between Yottabyte and ARC-TS announced last fall.

The following functionalities are immediately available:

  • Structured databases:  MySQL/MariaDB, and PostgreSQL.
  • Unstructured databases: Cassandra, MongoDB, InfluxDB, Grafana, and ElasticSearch.
  • Data ingestion: Redis, Kafka, RabbitMQ.
  • Data processing: Apache Flink, Apache Storm, Node.js and Apache NiFi.

Other types of databases can be created upon request.

These tools are offered to all researchers at the University of Michigan free of charge, provided that certain usage restrictions are not exceeded. Large-scale users who outgrow the no-cost allotment may purchase additional YBRC resources. All interested parties should contact hpc-support@umich.edu.

At this time, the YBRC platform only accepts unrestricted data. The platform is expected to accommodate restricted data within the next few months.

ARC-TS also operates a separate data science computing cluster available for researchers using the latest Hadoop components. This cluster also will be expanded in the near future.

XSEDE Research Allocation Requests due July 15th

By | Educational, General Interest, HPC, News

XSEDE Allocations award eligible users access to compute, visualization, and/or storage resources as well as extended support services.

XSEDE has various types of allocations from short term exploratory request to year long projects. In order to access to XSEDE resources you must have an allocation. Submit your allocation requests via the XSEDE Resource Allocation System (XRAS) in the XSEDE User Portal.

ARC-TS consultants can help researchers navigate the XSEDE resources and process. Contact them at hpc-support@umich.edu

ARC-TS seeks input on next generation HPC cluster

By | Events, Flux, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

The University of Michigan is beginning the process of building our next generation HPC platform, “Big House.”  Flux, the shared HPC cluster, has reached the end of its useful life. Flux has served us well for more than five years, but as we move forward with replacement, we want to make sure we’re meeting the needs of the research community.

ARC-TS will be holding a series of town halls to take input from faculty and researchers on the next HPC platform to be built by the University.  These town halls are open to anyone and will be held at:

  • College of Engineering, Johnson Room, Tuesday, June 20th, 9:00a – 10:00a
  • NCRC Bldg 300, Room 376, Wednesday, June 21st, 11:00a – 12:00p
  • LSA #2001, Tuesday, June 27th, 10:00a – 11:00a
  • 3114 Med Sci I, Wednesday, June 28th, 2:00p – 3:00p

Your input will help to ensure that U-M is on course for providing HPC, so we hope you will make time to attend one of these sessions. If you cannot attend, please email hpc-support@umich.edu with any input you want to share.

HPC training workshops begin Monday, May 15

By | General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held May 15, May 17 and May 24, 2017, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS). All sessions are held at East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
• Monday, May 15, 9 a.m. – noon. (full descriptionregistration)

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
• Wednesday, May 17, 1 – 4:30 p.m. (full description | registration)

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, and a brief introduction to scientific computing with Python, among other topics.
• Wednesday, May 24, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

NOTE: Additional workshops may be scheduled if demand warrants. Please sign up for the waiting list if the workshops are full, and you will be given first priority for any additional sessions.

New private insurance claims dataset and analytic support now available to health care researchers

By | General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News | No Comments

The Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation (IHPI) is partnering with Advanced Research Computing (ARC) to bring two commercial claims datasets to campus researchers.

The OptumInsight and Truven Marketscan datasets contain nearly complete insurance claims and other health data on tens of millions of people representing the US private insurance population. Within each dataset, records can be linked longitudinally for over 5 years.  

To begin working with the data, researchers should submit a brief analysis plan for review by IHPI staff, who will create extracts or grant access to primary data as appropriate.

CSCAR consultants are available to provide guidance on computational and analytic methods for a variety of research aims, including use of Flux and other UM computing infrastructure for working with these large and complex repositories.

Contact Patrick Brady (pgbrady@umich.edu) at IHPI or James Henderson (jbhender@umich.edu) at CSCAR for more information.

The data acquisition and availability was funded by IHPI and the U-M Data Science Initiative.