Angela Violi

By | | No Comments

Angela Violi is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and adjunct faculty in Chemical Engineering, Biophysics, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Applied Physics. The research in the group of Violi is focused on the application of statistical mechanics and computational methods to chemically and physically oriented problems in nanomaterials and biology. The group investigates the formation mechanisms of nanomaterials for various applications, including energy and biomedical systems, and the dynamics of biological systems and their interactions with nanomaterials.

violinanoparticlegenesis

Robert Ziff

By | | No Comments

Professor Ziff carries out computational and theoretical studies of various physical problems, most notably percolation but also catalysis modeling and several reaction/diffusion systems.  For percolation, he has developed various algorithms that have allowed substantial increases in performance, for the study of threshold behavior, crossing probability, etc. He also studies algorithms for efficiently simulating rare-event simulations such as chemical reactions and diffusion-limited aggregation.

ziff-copy

Inside a diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) cluster, grown using an accelerated rare-event algorithm.

Ronald Larson

By | | No Comments

Ronald Larson is the A.H. White and G.G. Brown Professor of Chemical Engineering. He is affiliated with the departments of Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. He currently serves as interim Chair of Biomedical Engineering. Larson’s research interests include theory and simulations of the structure and flow properties of viscous or elastic fluids, sometimes called “complex fluids,” which include polymers, colloids, surfactant-containing fluids, liquid crystals, and biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipid membranes. He also studies computational fluid mechanics, including microfluidics, and transport modeling, using mesoscopic and macroscopic simulation methods.  He has written numerous scientific papers and two books on these subjects, including a 1998 textbook, “The Structure and Rheology of Complex Fluids.”

Simulated three dimensional self assembly of spherical “Janus” particles with attractive faces (blue, on far left and red on far right) and non-attractive faces (white). The far left shows packing in the “rotator” phase, where the attractive faces have not ordered orientationally, which occurs at lower temperature. Other images show single sphere, or groups of spheres, indicating hexagonal ordering. Surrounding points show positions of surrounding spheres, at multiple time points, indicating motions about crystal lattice points.

Simulated three dimensional self assembly of spherical “Janus” particles with attractive faces (blue, on far left and red on far right) and non-attractive faces (white). The far left shows packing in the “rotator” phase, where the attractive faces have not ordered orientationally, which occurs at lower temperature. Other images show single sphere, or groups of spheres, indicating hexagonal ordering. Surrounding points show positions of surrounding spheres, at multiple time points, indicating motions about crystal lattice points.

Sharon Glotzer

By | | No Comments

Sharon Glotzer is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Material Science and Engineering. The Glotzer group uses computer simulations to discover the fundamental principles by which nanoscale systems of building blocks self-assemble into higher order, complex, and often hierarchical structures. Their goal is to learn how to manipulate matter at the molecular, nanoparticle, and colloidal scales to create “designer” structures through assembly engineering. Using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation codes developed in-house for graphics processors (GPUs) and scalable to large hybrid CPU/GPU clusters, they are the leading computational assembly group in the world, with the most powerful codes for studying assembly and packing. Among others, they are the lead developer of HOOMD-Blue, the fastest molecular dynamics code written solely for GPUs and distributed freely as open source software on codeblue.umich.edu.  Based on the fundament scientific principles of assembly gleaned from their studies, they carry out high throughout simulations for materials by design, contributing to the national Materials Genome Initiative.

Shapes can arrange themselves into crystal structures through entropy alone, new computational research from the University of Michigan shows.

Shapes can arrange themselves into crystal structures through entropy alone, new computational research from the University of Michigan shows.