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Angela Violi

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Angela Violi is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and adjunct faculty in Chemical Engineering, Biophysics, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Applied Physics. The research in the group of Violi is focused on the application of statistical mechanics and computational methods to chemically and physically oriented problems in nanomaterials and biology. The group investigates the formation mechanisms of nanomaterials for various applications, including energy and biomedical systems, and the dynamics of biological systems and their interactions with nanomaterials.

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Allison Steiner

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Allison Steiner is an Associate Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering. Her research focus is on the relationship between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere to help understand the bigger question: how will the Earth respond to climate change? Her research integrates gas and particulate matter, including anthropogenic aerosols and natural aerosols such as pollen, into high-resolution models. She and her research group then compare these results with observations to develop a comprehensive understanding of regional scale climate and atmospheric chemistry.

Study of the sensitivity of two dust parametrizations of the regional climate model RegCM4 between 2007-2014 over the Sahara dn the Mediterranean. Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/acp-2016-434, 2016

Study of the sensitivity of two dust parametrizations of the regional climate model RegCM4 between 2007-2014 over the Sahara and the Mediterranean. Tsikerdekis et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/acp-2016-434, 2016

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Marisa Eisenberg

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Marisa Eisenberg is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, and in the Department of Mathematics. Her research revolves around mathematical epidemiology, focus on using and developing parameter estimation and identifiability techniques to model disease dynamics. Her group builds multi-scale models of infectious disease, including HPV, cholera and other environmentally driven diseases.

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Likelihood surface exhibiting issues of unidentifiability—colors indicate goodness-of-fit, and the white line shows the values taken by an optimization algorithm as it navigates the surface.

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Liang Qi

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Professor Qi’s research fields are investigations of the mechanical and chemical properties of materials by applying theoretical and computational tools, including first-principles calculations, atomistic simulations and multiscale modeling. His major research interests are quantitative understanding of the intrinsic electronic/atomistic mechanisms for the mechanical deformation, phase transformation and chemical degradation (corrosion/oxidation) of advanced alloys and other structural/functional materials. Currently he is focusing on the studies of deformation defects and interfaces in materials under extreme conditions, such as high stress and/or chemically active environment, where the materials behaviors and properties can be dramatically different than those predicted by classical theories and models. He is also developing the numerical methods to integrate these electronic/atomistic results with large-scale simulations and experimental characterizations in order to design materials with improved mechanical performances and chemical stabilities.

A Jahn-Teller distortion signifies the onset of the shear instability for a body-centered-cubic crystal placed under tension. The symmetry breaking correlates with the intrinsic ductility of the material, and the strain at which it appears can be controlled by alloying.

A Jahn-Teller distortion signifies the onset of the shear instability for a body-centered-cubic crystal placed under tension. The symmetry breaking correlates with the intrinsic ductility of the material, and the strain at which it appears can be controlled by alloying.

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Jennifer Linderman

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The Linderman group works in the area of computational biology, especially in developing multi-scale models that link molecular, cellular and tissue level events.   Current areas of focus include: (1) hybrid multi-scale agent-based modeling to simulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and identify potential therapies, (2) models of signal transduction, particularly for G-protein coupled receptors, and (3) multi-scale agent-based models of cancer cell chemotaxis.

Hybrid multi-scale model of the immune response to Myobacterium tuberculosis in the lung. Selected immune cell behaviors and interactions captured by the model are shown. Not shown are single cell receptor/ligand dynamics involving the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10).

Hybrid multi-scale model of the immune response to Myobacterium tuberculosis in the lung. Selected immune cell behaviors and interactions captured by the model are shown. Not shown are single cell receptor/ligand dynamics involving the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10).

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Veera Sundararaghavan

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Prof. Sundararaghavan develops multi-scale computational methods for polycrystalline alloys, polymer composites, and ultra-high temperature ceramic composites to model the effect of microstructure on the overall deformation, fatigue, failure, thermal transport and oxidation response. Recent packages developed include a fully parallel multiscale approach for optimization of polycrystalline alloys during forming processes and a multiscale approach for modeling oxidative degradation in high temperature fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. He has made seminal contributions towards the use of multiscale models for accelerated “microstructure-sensitive design” including development of data mining methods for microstructures and reduced order techniques for graphical visualization of microstructure-process-property relationships.

Results from a parallel crystal plasticity code showing the stress distribution in Aluminum alloy microstructure during compression testing.

Results from a parallel crystal plasticity code showing the stress distribution in Aluminum alloy microstructure during compression testing.

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Christiane Jablonowski

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Christiane Jablonowski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering. Her research is highly interdisciplinary and combines atmospheric science, applied mathematics, computational science and high-performance computing. Her research suggests new pathways to bridge the wide range of spatial scales between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global high-resolution simulations. In particular, she advances variable-resolution and Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques for future-generation weather and climate models that are built upon a cubed-sphere computational mesh. Variable-resolution meshes enable climate modelers to focus the computational resources on features or regions of interest, and thereby allow an assessment of the many multi-scale interactions between, for example, tropical cyclones and the general circulation of the atmosphere.

Dr. Jablonowski organizes summer schools, dynamical core model intercomparison projects, teaches tutorials on parallel computing and climate modeling, develops cyber-infrastructure tools for the climate sciences, and has co-edited and co-authored a book on numerical methods for atmospheric models.

Snapshot of a 2D atmospheric model simulation showing a developing wave that is dynamically tracked by a block-structured and adaptive cubed-sphere computational mesh. Blue and red colors denote a clockwise and counterclockwise rotational motion, respectively.

Snapshot of a 2D atmospheric model simulation showing a developing wave that is dynamically tracked by a block-structured and adaptive cubed-sphere computational mesh. Blue and red colors denote a clockwise and counterclockwise rotational motion, respectively.

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Joyce Penner

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Prof. Penner’s research is adding the impacts of contrail formation within a global climate model. This involves following the physics from scales that treat aerosols (sub-micron sizes) to contrails (hundreds of meters) to climate (hundreds of kilometers). Computational aspects involve how to efficiently treat interactions across these scales.

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Derek Posselt

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Derek J. Posselt is a Deputy Principal Investigator of the NASA CYGNSS EV-2 Mission. He is an sponsored Affiliate of U-M Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering. His research seeks to quantify the multi-scale interactions that govern the feedback response of dynamically organized cloud systems to changes in the Earth’s climate. It is designed to capitalize on the convergence between modern computing resources, global observing systems, and nonlinear ensemble-based data assimilation methods. Posselt uses large-domain high-resolution numerical simulations to simultaneously resolve global and local atmospheric processes. He mines datasets collected by in-situ and remote sensing observing systems for information on the Earth’s hydrologic cycle. Posselt generates ensembles of millions of individual numerical simulations to estimate the envelope of uncertainty in projections of Earth’s future climate. Each of these efforts is not only computationally demanding, but also data-intensive, and depends critically on the availability and efficient use of large-capacity computational resources.

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Sherif El-Tawil

Sherif El-Tawil

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Prof. El-Tawil’s general research interest lies in computational modeling, analysis, and testing of structural materials and systems. He is especially interested in how buildings and bridges behave under the extreme loading conditions generated by manmade and natural hazards such as seismic excitation, collision by heavy objects, and blast. The focus of his research effort is to investigate how to utilize new materials, concepts and technologies to create innovative structural systems that mitigate the potentially catastrophic effects of extreme loading.

Much of his research is directed towards the computational and theoretical aspects of structural engineering, with particular emphasis on computational simulation, constitutive modeling, multiscale techniques, macro-plasticity formulations, nonlinear solution strategies and visualization methods. Prof. El-Tawil also has a strong and long-sustained interest in multi-disciplinary research. He has conducted research in human decision making and social interactions during extreme events and the use of agent based models for egress simulations. He is also interested in visualization and has developed new techniques for applying virtual reality in the field of finite element simulations and the use of augmented reality for rapid assessment of infrastructure damage in the wake of disasters.
Modeling the collapse response of a 10-story building.

Modeling the collapse response of a 10-story building.