Filipov,Evgueni

Evgueni Filipov

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Evgueni Filipov is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interests lie in the field of deployable and reconfigurable structural systems. Folding and adaptable structures based on the principles of origami can have practical applications ranging in scale and discipline from biomedical robotics to deployable architecture.

His research is focused on developing computational tools that can simulate mechanical and multi-physical phenomena of deployable structures. The analytical models incorporate folding kinematics along with local and global phenomenological behaviors. Prof. Filipov uses finite element and  constitutive modeling to better understand how geometry affects elastic deformations and other physical properties of the deployable and adaptable structures. He is interested in optimization of such systems and large scale parametric studies to explore the design space and potential applications of the systems.

Elastic deformations of a deployable origami tubes (Filipov et al. PNAS 2015)

Elastic deformations of a deployable origami tubes (Filipov et al. PNAS 2015)

PhaniMotamarri

Phani Motamarri

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Phani Motamarri is an Assistant Research Scientist in the department of Mechanical Engineering. His research interests lie in the broad scope of computational materials science with emphasis on computational nano-science leading to applications in the areas of mechanics of materials and energy. His research is strongly multidisciplinary, drawing ideas from applied mathematics, data science, quantum-mechanics, solid-mechanics, materials science and scientific computing.

The current research focus lies in developing systematically improvable real-space computational methodologies and associated mathematical techniques for conducting large-scale electronic-structure (ab-initio) calculations -via- density functional theory (DFT). Massively parallel and scalable numerical algorithms using finite-elements (DFT-FE) are developed as a part of this research effort, which enabled large-scale DFT calculations on tens of thousands of atoms for the first time using finite-element basis. These computational methods will aid fundamental studies on defects in materials, molecular and nanoscale systems which otherwise would have been difficult to study with the existing state of the art computational methods. Current areas of application include — (a) first-principles modelling of energetics of point defects and dislocations in Al, Mg and its alloys which are popular in light-weighting applications to provide useful inputs to meso-scale and continuum models, (b) providing all-electron DFT input to advanced electronic structure approaches like the GW method for accurate prediction of electronic properties in semiconductor-materials.

Electron-density contours of 3430 atom aluminum nanocluster using pseudopotential DFT-FE

Electron-density contours of 3430 atom aluminum nanocluster using pseudopotential DFT-FE

Electron density contours of 3920 electron silicon nanocluster using all-electron DFT-FE

Electron density contours of 3920 electron silicon nanocluster using all-electron DFT-FE

Computational time (CPU-Hrs) per SCF iteration for the reduced-scaling subspace projection method and conventional diagonalization approach(ChFSI-FE). Case study: Alkane chains upto 7000 atoms.

Computational time (CPU-Hrs) per SCF iteration for the reduced-scaling subspace projection method and conventional diagonalization approach(ChFSI-FE). Case study: Alkane chains upto 7000 atoms.

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Silas Alben

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Silas Alben is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics, and the Director of the Applied & Interdisciplinary Mathematics program. He uses theoretical analysis, and develops numerical methods and models of problems arising from biology, especially biomechanics and engineering. Some of his group’s current applications are piezoelectric flags, flag fluttering in inviscid channel flow, snake locomotion and jet-propelled swimming.

Equilibrium configurations of actuated bilayers with general initial shapes. S. Alben, Adv. Comp. Math., 2014

Equilibrium configurations of actuated bilayers with general initial shapes. S. Alben, Adv. Comp. Math., 2014

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George Alter

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George Alter is Research Professor at ICPSR and the Population Studies Center and Professor of History at the University of Michigan. His research grows out of interests in the history of the family, demography, and economic history, and recent projects have examined the effects of early life conditions on health in old age and new ways of describing fertility transitions. He is also involved in international efforts to promote research transparency and data sharing.
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Santiago Schnell

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Santiago Schnell’s lab combines chemical kinetics, molecular modeling, biochemical measurements and computational modeling to build a comprehensive understanding of proteostasis and protein forlding diseases. They also investigate other complex physiological systems comprising many interacting components, where modeling and theory may aid in the identification of the key mechanisms underlying the behavior of the system as a whole.

Representation of the human protein-protein interaction network showing disordered (yellow) and ordered (blue) proteins.

Representation of the human protein-protein interaction network showing disordered (yellow) and ordered (blue) proteins.

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Kai Sun

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His  research focuses on understanding the role of strong correction effects in many-body quantum systems. The objective is to discover novel quantum states/materials and to understand their exotic properties using theoretical/numerical methods (with emphasis on topological properties). In his research, numerical techniques are applied to resolve the fate of a quantum material (or a theoretical model) in the presence of multiple competing ground states and to provide quantitative guidance for further (experimental/theoretical) investigations.

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Interaction induced topological insulator with spontaneously-generated orbital rotations. This figure demonstrate how to use strong interactions to generate a topological state of matter in a many-body quantum system.

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Eric Michielssen

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Eric Michielssen is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science – Electrical and Computer Engineering Division and Associate Vice President for Advanced Research Computing.

His research interests include all aspects of theoretical, applied, and computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on the development of fast (primarily) integral-equation-based techniques for analyzing electromagnetic phenomena. His group studies fast multipole methods for analyzing static and high frequency electronic and optical devices, fast direct solvers for scattering analysis, and butterfly algorithms for compressing matrices that arise in the integral equation solution of large-scale electromagnetic problems.

Furthermore, the group works on plane-wave-time-domain algorithms that extend fast multipole concepts to the time domain, and develop time-domain versions of pre-corrected FFT/adaptive integral methods.  Collectively, these algorithms allow the integral equation analysis of time-harmonic and transient electromagnetic phenomena in large-scale linear and nonlinear surface scatterers, antennas, and circuits.

Recently, the group developed powerful Calderon multiplicative preconditioners for accelerating time domain integral equation solvers applied to the analysis of multiscale phenomena, and used the above analysis techniques to develop new closed-loop and multi-objective optimization tools for synthesizing electromagnetic devices, as well as to assist in uncertainty quantification studies relating to electromagnetic compatibility and bioelectromagnetic problems.

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Electromagnetic analysis of computer board and metamaterial.

Kevin Maki (Research Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer

Kevin Maki

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Dr. Maki works in the field of fluid mechanics, and his central focus is on developing algorithms for numerical computation of high-Reynolds number external flows that contain an air-water interface. Research interests include investigating free-surface hydrodynamics for analysis and design of high-performance naval craft and renewable-energy devices. Theoretical effort is focused on accurate description of the flow about marine vessels. Numerical research employs finite-volume and boundary element techniques to solve equations appropriate to govern the performance of ships maneuvering in waves, and energy devices and structures that operate in the ocean.

Divakar Viswanath

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Divakar Viswanath is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. His research is at the interface of scientific computation and nonlinear dynamics. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are a major point of current interest. Turbulent dynamics is locally unstable and bounded in phase space. In such scenarios, dynamical systems theory predicts the existence of periodic solutions (modulo symmetries). Professor Viswanath has developed algorithms to extract periodic solutions and traveling waves from turbulent dynamics. One goal of current research is to derive, implement, and demonstrate algorithms that simulate turbulent flows at higher Reynolds numbers than is currently possible. It appears that this goal will be met shortly. Professor Viswanath has a general interest in foundational numerical analysis ranging from interpolation theory to the solution of differential equations.

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Kenneth Powell

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Prof. Powell’s work focuses on algorithm development for fluid dynamics, aerodynamics and plasmadynamics, and the application of computational methods to problems in aerodynamics, aeroelasticicty, fluid dynamics and space environment/space weather.

Simulation results for interaction of a solar coronal mass ejection with Earth’s magnetosphere.

Simulation results for interaction of a solar coronal mass ejection with Earth’s magnetosphere.