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Santiago Schnell

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Santiago Schnell’s lab combines chemical kinetics, molecular modeling, biochemical measurements and computational modeling to build a comprehensive understanding of proteostasis and protein forlding diseases. They also investigate other complex physiological systems comprising many interacting components, where modeling and theory may aid in the identification of the key mechanisms underlying the behavior of the system as a whole.

Representation of the human protein-protein interaction network showing disordered (yellow) and ordered (blue) proteins.

Representation of the human protein-protein interaction network showing disordered (yellow) and ordered (blue) proteins.

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Charles Doering

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Charles Doering is the Nicholas D. Kazarinoff Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Mathematics and Physics and the Director of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). He uses stochastic, dynamical systems arising in biology, chemistry and physics models, as well as systems of nonlinear partial differential equations to extract reliable, rigorous and useful predictions. His research spans rigorous estimation, numerical simulations and abstract functional and probabilistic analysis.

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Don Siegel

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Don Siegel is an Associate Professor affiliated with the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Department of Material Science and Engineering. His research targets the discovery, characterization, and understanding of novel materials for energy-related applications. These efforts primarily employ atomic scale modeling to predict thermodynamic properties and kinetics. These data provide the necessary ingredients for identifying performance limiting mechanisms and for the “virtual screening” of candidate compounds having desired properties. Prof. Siegel is currently exploring several varieties of energy storage materials, lightweight structural alloys, and materials suitable for use in carbon capture applications.

Atomic scale model of a liquid electrolyte/solid Li2O2 interface in a Li-air battery cathode.

Atomic scale model of a liquid electrolyte/solid Li2O2 interface in a Li-air battery cathode.

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Kai Sun

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His  research focuses on understanding the role of strong correction effects in many-body quantum systems. The objective is to discover novel quantum states/materials and to understand their exotic properties using theoretical/numerical methods (with emphasis on topological properties). In his research, numerical techniques are applied to resolve the fate of a quantum material (or a theoretical model) in the presence of multiple competing ground states and to provide quantitative guidance for further (experimental/theoretical) investigations.

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Interaction induced topological insulator with spontaneously-generated orbital rotations. This figure demonstrate how to use strong interactions to generate a topological state of matter in a many-body quantum system.

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Udo Becker

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Professor Becker leads an interdisciplinary group to understand problems in surface geochemistry and computational mineralogy, thus there are research opportunities in fields ranging from experimental approaches and computational modeling of actinide geochemistry (U immobilization in the environment, actinide-containing solids under extreme pressure, temperature, and radiation, U/Np/Pu redox processes) to carbonate biomineralization. Other research includes calculating redox processes (including resolving individual kinetic barriers that control kinetics) carbonate and phosphate biomineralization (from environmental applications to processes on teeth). As a part of Mineralogy and Materials Science Research Group, Becker’s group  interacts with Radiation Effects and Radioactive Waste Management group, Michigan Geomicrobiology group, Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory (EMAL) and Mineral Physics group.

Band decomposed charge density associated with the defect state at -0.7eV, introduced by Pu occupying the A site in Ca3Zr2(FE2Si)O12.

Band decomposed charge density associated with the defect state at -0.7eV, introduced by Pu occupying the A site in Ca3Zr2(FE2Si)O12.

 

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Jennifer Linderman

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The Linderman group works in the area of computational biology, especially in developing multi-scale models that link molecular, cellular and tissue level events.   Current areas of focus include: (1) hybrid multi-scale agent-based modeling to simulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and identify potential therapies, (2) models of signal transduction, particularly for G-protein coupled receptors, and (3) multi-scale agent-based models of cancer cell chemotaxis.

Hybrid multi-scale model of the immune response to Myobacterium tuberculosis in the lung. Selected immune cell behaviors and interactions captured by the model are shown. Not shown are single cell receptor/ligand dynamics involving the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10).

Hybrid multi-scale model of the immune response to Myobacterium tuberculosis in the lung. Selected immune cell behaviors and interactions captured by the model are shown. Not shown are single cell receptor/ligand dynamics involving the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10).

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C. David Remy

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C. David Remy is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and head of the Robotics and Motion Laboratory. The lab seeks to systematically exploit mechanical dynamics to make future robots faster, more efficient, and more agile.  Inspired by nature, the group designs and controls robots whose motion emerges in great part passively from the interaction of inertia, gravity, and elastic oscillations, and is merely initiated and shaped through active actuator inputs. In the long term vision, the lab’s research will allow the development of systems that reach and even exceed the agility of humans and animals. It will enable us to build autonomous robots that can run as fast as a cheetah and as enduring as a husky, while mastering the same terrain as a mountain goat. To this end, the group will develop appropriate methods for the control and design of robots. It will draw inspiration from biomechanics and biology, deepen our theoretical understanding of natural dynamics through simulation, and employ advanced numerical optimization as primary tool for systematic design and development.

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Valeriy Ivanov

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His research targets spatially-explicit interactions and feedbacks among components of environmental systems and builds on the development of and experimentation with physics/process-oriented models of water, energy, and element cycles at the plant, hillslope, catchment, and larger scales and the integration of observational data and models. Specific topics include high-resolution flood forecasting using coupled hydrologic-hydrodynamic modeling; assessment of climate impacts on watershed systems; simulation-based studies of ecohydrology of vegetation life-cycle processes and land-surface feedbacks; plant-scale modeling of water uptake and transpiration processes; and modeling of erosion and sediment transport.

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Michael Liemohn

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His research interests focus on understanding the physical processes controlling energetic charged particle motion in planetary magnetospheres, including Earth.  He writes and uses space plasma physics numerical models, especially kinetic modeling that resolves velocity space distributions but also large-scale magnetohydrodynamic models.  Prof. Liemohn is especially interested in the nonlinear coupling within planetary magnetospheres during strong solar wind driving intervals (i.e., system-level feedback during space storms).

 

Simulation results of near-Earth space during a magnetic storm event, showing electric current traces overlaid on the plasma pressure distribution in the noon-midnight plane and radial current density on the inner boundary sphere of the simulation domain (radius of 2.5 R_E). The three colors of the current traces correspond to different current systems: symmetric ring current (pink), partial ring current (green), and tail current (blue). Magnetic field lines in the midnight plane are shown in black, revealing that these three current systems coexist on the same magnetic field line. From Liemohn et al. [GRL, 2011].

Simulation results of near-Earth space during a magnetic storm event, showing electric current traces overlaid on the plasma pressure distribution in the noon-midnight plane and radial current density on the inner boundary sphere of the simulation domain (radius of 2.5 R_E). The three colors of the current traces correspond to different current systems: symmetric ring current (pink), partial ring current (green), and tail current (blue). Magnetic field lines in the midnight plane are shown in black, revealing that these three current systems coexist on the same magnetic field line. From Liemohn et al. [GRL, 2011].

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David Sept

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David Sept is a Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and he is affiliated with the Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics. The Sept lab works in the area of computational biology and we use a wide array of computational techniques to study protein, drug and cellular systems.  In addition to “standard” simulation techniques like molecular dynamics, we are developing new simulation and analysis methods for application in more complex systems.