Annette Ostling

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Annette Ostling is an Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Her lab focuses on the mechanisms by which competing species coexist, and how those mechanisms influence the structural patterns of ecological communities, i.e. the presence and relative abundance of species, and their distribution on axes of trait variation.  A key approach the lab takes is the simulation of stochastic community assembly models, which enable examination of the influence of immigration and demographic stochasticity in combination with mechanisms of niche differentiation.  Her group also uses computational approaches to study the evolution of species interactions, especially predation and host-pathogen interactions, in a spatial context.

Siqian Shen

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Prof. Shen’s research derives multifaceted mathematical optimization models for decision making under data uncertainty and information ambiguity. The models she considers often feature stochastic parameters and discrete (0-1) decision variables. The goal is to seek optimal solutions for balancing risk and cost objectives associated with complex systems. She also develops efficient algorithms for solving the large-scale optimization models, based on integer programming, stochastic and data-driven approaches, and special network topologies. In particular, her research has been applied to cyberinfrastructure design and operations management problems related to power grids, transportation, and Cloud Computing systems.

A sensor monitored network for research allocation and routing in highly uncertain environments (e.g., post-disaster delivery, highly congested traffic system, or high-demand computing network). The network is structured by solving a general mathematical optimization model.

A sensor monitored network for research allocation and routing in highly uncertain environments (e.g., post-disaster delivery, highly congested traffic system, or high-demand computing network). The network is structured by solving a general mathematical optimization model.

Karthik Duraisamy

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Prof. Duraisamy is interested in the development of computational models, algorithms and uncertainty quantification approaches with application to fluid flows. This research includes fluid dynamic modeling at a fundamental level as well as in an integrated system-level setting. An overarching theme in his research involves the use of simulation and data-driven methods to answer scientific and engineering questions with an appreciation of the effect of modeling uncertainties on the predicted results. Prof. Duraisamy’s group is also interested in developing numerical algorithms to  operate on evolving computational architectures such as GPUs. He is the Director of the Center for Data-Driven Computational Physics.

Combustion in a turbulent boundary layer.