Professor Karthik Duraisamy (U-M Aerospace Engineering) demonstrates data-driven turbulence modeling.

The Center for Data-Driven Computational Physics was established as a place to concentrate data-driven modeling research across campus. Its activities are focused on ConFlux, a $3.5M groundbreaking cluster funded by NSF with a unique architecture that connects big-data with traditional HPC clusters. ConFlux went online in April, and several teams are already using it, with five projects participating, totaling more than $3M to advance data-driven modeling. Soon, we expect to announce even more successes that are directly attributable to our pioneering role in this research area. 

The Center for Network and Storage-Enabled Collaborative Computational Science was established to tackle the challenges of extracting scientific results collaboratively from large, distributed or diverse data. This research center is a product of the Open Storage Research Infrastructure (OSiRIS), a $5M multi-institutional NSF investment, and is led by MICDE affiliated  research faculty Shawn McKee.

We hosted 16 internationally known speakers in our seminar series, and had a very successful symposium. With speakers including NSF’s ACI Director Irene Qualters, Tom Hughes from ICES, James Sethian from UC Berkeley, Charbel Farhat from Stanford, and Peter Haas from IBM, these events outlined top priorities in our fields, latest research and computing infrastructure, and increased  awareness of the quality and trend-imposing nature of research activities going on at U-M.


Jim Belak (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) delivers a talk titled “Preparing for the Future of Computing: Bridging Scales within the Exascale Materials Co-design Center” as part of MICDE Winter 2016 Seminar Series.

MICDE is coordinating or supporting several large proposal submissions to federal agencies. We offer institutional support and our established educational programs to the faculty teams writing these grants. With the backing of our parent unit, Advanced Research Computing, and their technical and consulting services (ARC-Technology Services, and Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research), our proposals have proven stronger by virtue of this support in place behind them.

MICDE also is working with the academic units at U-M to identify compelling new directions for hiring faculty who will drive computational science in the future, and supporting these hiring processes. Many of these blue-sky ideas have come from thematic, faculty-led workshops, which we will continue to organize.