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Research Highlight: Improving aircraft aeropropulsive performance with multidisciplinary design optimization

By | News, Research

Anil Yildirim, Ph.D. Candidate, Aerospace Engineering

MICDE fellow Anil Yildirim, a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Aerospace Engineering, is working towards improving the overall efficiency of commercial tube-and-wing aircraft. The current commercial aircraft design with underwing engines have been the norm since the introduction of the Boeing 707 in the late 50’s [1]. With technological progress in composite materials and electric propulsion, as well as advancement of computational methods and computer power, researchers are developing more energy efficient systems to replace this legacy design. Working with the MDO Lab, lead by Prof. Joaquim R.R.A. Martins, and a team from NASA, Anil is studying the boundary layer ingestion (BLI) system on the STARC–ABL concept, introduced by NASA in 2016 [2] . BLI is an aeropropulsive concept, where a propulsion system is used to ingest the boundary layer generated by the aircraft. This increases propulsive efficiency and reduces the energy dissipated in the wake, effectively improving the overall aeropropulsive performance of the aircraft. Anil and his colleagues in the MDO Lab are using multidisciplinary analysis and optimization tools to study similar technologies, where design intuition is limited and interdisciplinary trades are important. Watch this video to learn more about his work (Authors: Anil Yildirim, Justin S. Gray, Charles A. Mader, Joaquim R. R. A. Martins, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2019-3455)

 

[1] “707/720 Commercial Transport: Historical Snapshot,” 2015, http://www.boeing.com/history/
products/707.page
[2] https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160007674.pdf

MICDE Director, Krishna Garikipati, wins USACM Fellow award

By | News, Uncategorized

Krishna Garikipati, professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Mathematics, and director of MICDE, has been granted a 2019 United States Association for Computational Mechanics (USACM) Fellows award for his work in developing numerical methods applied to strongly nonlinear problems in living and nonliving material systems.

The Fellows Award recognizes individuals with a distinguished record of research, accomplishment and publication in areas of computational mechanics and demonstrated support of the USACM through membership and participation in the Association, its meetings and activities. All recipients shall be members in good standing of USACM. Multiple awards may be given at two-year intervals.

MICDE to host NSF Computational Mechanics Vision workshop

By | News

In Fall 2019, MICDE will host the NSF workshop entitled Computational Mechanics Vision Workshop. Organized by Boston University, Duke University and the University of Michigan. The workshop’s aim is to solicit and synthesize directions for computational mechanics research and education in the United States over the next decade and beyond from a diverse cross section of scientists and engineers.  Read more…

 

Introducing the new Clare Boothe Luce Graduate Fellows at the University of Michigan

By | Feature, News

The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering is pleased to announce the recipients of the Clare Boothe Luce graduate fellowships at the University of Michigan. Jessica Conrad, MS, currently an internee at LLNL, and Elizabeth Livingston, MS, a graduate of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, will be joining the University of Michigan in the Fall of 2019 to work towards their PhD. They were chosen because of their exceptional academic records and excellent preparation for graduate studies in computational sciences. Elizabeth will join the Mechanical Engineering department in the College of Engineering, and Jessica will join the Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics program in the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts. As required by the fellowship, both students will enroll in the joint PhD in Scientific Computing program.

Elizabeth Livingston, Clare Boothe Luce Fellow at the University of Michigan

Elizabeth Livingston completed a BSc in Engineering Mechanics (with a minor in Computational Science and Engineering) and a MS in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Elizabeth will join Prof. Garikipati’s research group in Mechanical Engineering. Elizabeth will carry out research in computational modeling of biomedical engineering problems. Of particular interest to her is the growth and remodeling of the cardio-vascular system. She will apply cutting-edge techniques of data-driven computational modeling to this topic using principles of scientific computing, including machine learning, uncertainty quantification, and finite element methods.

Elizabeth has a strong academic background, thriving while performing research in fields where women are underrepresented. Her ambition is to become a university faculty member, doing research in computational science. She looks forward to collaborating with colleagues and working with students to help them to succeed as others have helped her.

Jessica Conrad has a BS in mathematics and public health, a master’s in biostatistics, and an excellent track record of computational research both in her training and current work at Los Alamos National Laboratories. This background forms an ideal foundation for blending computing and mathematics in her PhD work, which will enable her to build a successful career in STEM. Jessica’s proposed area of study is in inverse problems in mathematical epidemiology, particularly focused on using computational and mathematical methods to gain useful insights into public health problems. A critical part of this work will include developing computational approaches to parameter identifiability. Conrad plans to work with Prof. Marisa Eisenberg, an expert in identifiability and infectious disease modeling, as one of her two primary co-mentors in the AIM program.

Jessica Conrad, Clare Boothe Luce Fellow at the University of Michigan

The Clare Boothe Luce program is funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. The program was created by Clare Boothe Luce, with the goal of increasing the participation of women in the sciences, mathematics and engineering at every level of higher education. It also serves as a catalyst for colleges and universities to be proactive in their own efforts toward this goal. At the University of Michigan, the program aims to increase women’s participation in the scientific computing community by recruiting top-of-the class women into the PhD in Scientific Computing program. The program is designed to allow the fellows to focus on their academic success by funding their first 3 years in the PhD, freeing them to try high-risk, innovative research projects in a unique interdisciplinary program, with ample networking opportunities and career support.

PhD student opening in Global Ocean Modeling and Scientific Computing

By | Educational, SC2 jobs

A PhD student is sought for a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project in Global Ocean Modeling and Scientific Computing. The student will work with Professor Brian Arbic at the University of Michigan (U-M), Dr. Phillip Wolfram and Dr. Andrew Roberts of DOE’s Los Alamos National Laboratory, and other DOE scientists. The student will be admitted to the PhD program of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and will attain a joint PhD in U-M’s Program in Scientific Computing.

Project Description

The project involves insertion of tides into the ocean component of the DOE Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM). The ocean component is based upon the Model Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) code, which uses a finite-element mesh to focus attention on coastal regions. With the addition of tidal forcing, the model will be an ideal tool with which to quantify the changes likely to occur in coastal areas over the next 50-100 years. The student will be strongly encouraged to spend significant time in Los Alamos, working alongside DOE scientists. The project is ideal for students who wish to apply the tools of scientific computing to societally relevant problems, in a university-DOE partnership with significant networking and travel opportunities. The project will increase the number of professionals familiar with both oceanography and computational science, an identified need in several federal ocean modeling centers including Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Application Procedure

  • Applicants must have strong quantitative and programming skills. Backgrounds in mathematics, computer science, physics, and related fields will be given highest consideration.
  • The preferred start date is January 1, 2020, but a start date of September 1, 2020 is also possible.
  • Students interested in applying to work with Professor Arbic should email their CV, unofficial transcript and cover letter, combined into a single PDF file to: Arbic-Ocean-Modeling-PhD@umich.edu. Questions about the project may also be sent to this email address.
  • In addition, an application to the PhD program in Earth and Environmental Sciences is required. See the Department website for application information. The application deadline to start in January 2020, is September 15, 2019. The application deadline for Fall 2020 is January 7, 2020.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity employer and is supportive of the needs of dual career couples. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply

Postdoctoral Position in in Machine Learning Methods for Computational Physics at U-M

By | General Interest, News, SC2 jobs

Postdoctoral Position

Machine Learning Methods for Computational Physics
University of Michigan
Department of Mechanical Engineering

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral research positions to join the Computational Physics group in mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan to develop machine learning methods for system identification of partial differential equations.

Qualifications

Applicants should have a doctoral degree in engineering or mathematics with a strong focus on computational science. Some combination of a familiarity with numerical methods for PDEs, high performance computing and machine learning would be ideal.

Compensation

Compensation (salary and benefits) will be offered according to University of Michigan.

The position is available immediately but starting date is negotiable. To apply please contact Prof. Krishna Garikipati at krishna@umich.edu

The University of Michigan offers a vibrant computational science community. 

Postdoctoral Position at U-M School of Public Health

By | General Interest, SC2 jobs

Postdoctoral Position

University of Michigan School of Public Health
Departments of Epidemiology and Health Management and Policy

Applications are invited for two two-year postdoctoral research positions to join the NIH-funded Center for the Assessment of the Public Health Impact of Tobacco Regulations, with a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional team of collaborators. The project will conduct analyses of the public health impact of tobacco regulations across a range of tobacco-related conditions and policy outcomes. The interdisciplinary team includes epidemiologists, economists, tobacco scientists, applied mathematicians and statisticians (Rafael Meza, David Mendez, Ken Warner, Nancy Fleischer (University of Michigan), David Levy (Georgetown University), Ted Holford (Yale University)).

Postdoc description and desired qualifications

The postdoc will develop and examine simulation models of tobacco use that explicitly consider multiple tobacco-products and multiple disease outcomes.

Desired areas of expertise include: dynamic and complex systems, parameter estimation, computer programming (familiarity with, R, Python, C++, Matlab), statistical analysis, econometrics and epidemiology modeling.

Experience developing mathematical/simulation models to address problems in public health, epidemiology or health outcomes is a plus.

Applicants should have a doctoral degree in Epidemiology, Health Economics, Econometric, Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Statistics, Operations Research or related field.

Compensation

Compensation (salary and benefits) will be offered according to University of Michigan and NIH guidelines.

The position is available immediately but starting date is negotiable. To apply please submit CV, names of references, and inquiries to Dr Rafael Meza at rmeza@umich.edu

The University of Michigan offers a vibrant mathematical modeling and complex systems community. Modeling expertise expands across departments including Epidemiology, Health Management and Policy, Complex Systems, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Mathematics and Statistics. The School of Public Health is renowned for its cutting-edge research on the applications of mathematical modeling in epidemiology and public health.

John von Neumann Postdoctoral Fellowship in Computational Science at Sandia

By | Funding Opportunities

Sandia National Laboratories invites outstanding candidates to apply for the 2019 John von Neumann Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Computational Science. This prestigious fellowship is partially supported by the Applied Mathematics Research Program in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research.

Past  John von Neumann fellows include Alex Gorodetsky (2016), assistant professor in U-M’s department of Aerospace Engineering and MICDE affiliated faculty, and Eric Parish (2018), an Aerospace Engineering alumni and past MICDE fellow.

The fellowship provides an exceptional opportunity for innovative research in computational mathematics and scientific computing on advanced computing architectures with application to a broad range of science and engineering problems of national importance. Applicants must have or soon receive a Ph.D. in applied/computational mathematics or related computational science and engineering disciplines. Applicants must have less than three years of postdoctoral experience. This appointment is for one year, with a possible renewal for a second year, and includes a highly competitive salary, moving expenses and a generous  professional travel allowance.

Applications will be reviewed upon receipt. Complete applications received by November 26, 2018 will receive full consideration.

For more information please visit https://www.sandia.gov/careers/students_postdocs/fellowships/johnvonneumann_fellowship.html/

[SC2 Jobs] Scientist for the development of VASP

By | SC2 jobs

Job Description

The Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) group seeks one scientist for the development of the software package VASP . VASP is a de facto standard for the simulation of condensed matter systems using the Schroedinger equation. A very exciting and lively working environment with many collaborative research projects involving theory as well as experimental groups is offered. The work will cover VASP software maintenance and support, optimization of the existing codes for latest high performance computer architectures (e.g. Intel Xeon, Nvidia GPU), cutting edge theory developments as enumerated below, as well as co-development of workflow tools (ASE, AiiDA, pymatgen, etc.)

Requirements

  • PhD in physics or chemistry
  • Excellent record in any area of computational solid state physics or chemistry. The areas of expertise can include – but are not restricted to – density functional theory, many-body Green’s function techniques, quantum field theoretical methods, quantum chemistry methods, or modeling of condensed matter systems.
  • Candidates with proven expertise in developing new computational methods and adapting them to high performance computers will be given preference.
  • Prior knowledge of VASP is advantageously but not strictly required.

Location

Vienna, Austria

To apply:

i) CV including full academic record,
ii) list of publications and talks including two reprints representative of previous research,
iii) expression of interest concerning research area(s) and previous expertise (one page).

Applications need to be sent to georg.kresse_at_univie.ac.at (topic: Scientific software developer).

Selection of candidates will start immediately and continue until the  positions are filled. The contract will be for one year initially, with the  possibility for a permanent contract after positive evaluation.

 

Sincerely,
The VASP team

[SC2 Jobs] Paid summer internship with ARC-TS and Science Gateways Community Institute

By | SC2 jobs

Hands-on work experiences for undergraduate and graduate students

The Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) Workforce Development team is looking for a summer intern interested in developing their gateway development skills. Eligible applicants include graduate students majoring in computer science or computer engineering (or related fields) at any level and undergraduates majoring in computer science or computer engineering (or related fields) who have completed their junior year and who demonstrate strong programming and software engineering skills.

Location: University of Michigan at ARC-TS offices (Central Campus)
Stipend: $500/week
Contact: Brock Palen at brockp@umich.edu ASAP

Interns will be required to attend the Gateways 2018 conference, for which SGCI Workforce Development will provide funding. Attending PEARC18 is recommended, but not required. Funding will be provided by SGCI Workforce Development to interns who decide to attend.

More information at sciencegateways.org/engage/internships *Note that even though the website says the application window is closed, ARC-TS still has a position opened.