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Postdoctoral Position in in Machine Learning Methods for Computational Physics at U-M

By | General Interest, News, SC2 jobs

Postdoctoral Position

Machine Learning Methods for Computational Physics
University of Michigan
Department of Mechanical Engineering

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral research positions to join the Computational Physics group in mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan to develop machine learning methods for system identification of partial differential equations.

Qualifications

Applicants should have a doctoral degree in engineering or mathematics with a strong focus on computational science. Some combination of a familiarity with numerical methods for PDEs, high performance computing and machine learning would be ideal.

Compensation

Compensation (salary and benefits) will be offered according to University of Michigan.

The position is available immediately but starting date is negotiable. To apply please contact Prof. Krishna Garikipati at krishna@umich.edu

The University of Michigan offers a vibrant computational science community. 

Postdoctoral Position at U-M School of Public Health

By | General Interest, SC2 jobs

Postdoctoral Position

University of Michigan School of Public Health
Departments of Epidemiology and Health Management and Policy

Applications are invited for two two-year postdoctoral research positions to join the NIH-funded Center for the Assessment of the Public Health Impact of Tobacco Regulations, with a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional team of collaborators. The project will conduct analyses of the public health impact of tobacco regulations across a range of tobacco-related conditions and policy outcomes. The interdisciplinary team includes epidemiologists, economists, tobacco scientists, applied mathematicians and statisticians (Rafael Meza, David Mendez, Ken Warner, Nancy Fleischer (University of Michigan), David Levy (Georgetown University), Ted Holford (Yale University)).

Postdoc description and desired qualifications

The postdoc will develop and examine simulation models of tobacco use that explicitly consider multiple tobacco-products and multiple disease outcomes.

Desired areas of expertise include: dynamic and complex systems, parameter estimation, computer programming (familiarity with, R, Python, C++, Matlab), statistical analysis, econometrics and epidemiology modeling.

Experience developing mathematical/simulation models to address problems in public health, epidemiology or health outcomes is a plus.

Applicants should have a doctoral degree in Epidemiology, Health Economics, Econometric, Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Statistics, Operations Research or related field.

Compensation

Compensation (salary and benefits) will be offered according to University of Michigan and NIH guidelines.

The position is available immediately but starting date is negotiable. To apply please submit CV, names of references, and inquiries to Dr Rafael Meza at rmeza@umich.edu

The University of Michigan offers a vibrant mathematical modeling and complex systems community. Modeling expertise expands across departments including Epidemiology, Health Management and Policy, Complex Systems, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Mathematics and Statistics. The School of Public Health is renowned for its cutting-edge research on the applications of mathematical modeling in epidemiology and public health.

John von Neumann Postdoctoral Fellowship in Computational Science at Sandia

By | Funding Opportunities

Sandia National Laboratories invites outstanding candidates to apply for the 2019 John von Neumann Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Computational Science. This prestigious fellowship is partially supported by the Applied Mathematics Research Program in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research.

Past  John von Neumann fellows include Alex Gorodetsky (2016), assistant professor in U-M’s department of Aerospace Engineering and MICDE affiliated faculty, and Eric Parish (2018), an Aerospace Engineering alumni and past MICDE fellow.

The fellowship provides an exceptional opportunity for innovative research in computational mathematics and scientific computing on advanced computing architectures with application to a broad range of science and engineering problems of national importance. Applicants must have or soon receive a Ph.D. in applied/computational mathematics or related computational science and engineering disciplines. Applicants must have less than three years of postdoctoral experience. This appointment is for one year, with a possible renewal for a second year, and includes a highly competitive salary, moving expenses and a generous  professional travel allowance.

Applications will be reviewed upon receipt. Complete applications received by November 26, 2018 will receive full consideration.

For more information please visit https://www.sandia.gov/careers/students_postdocs/fellowships/johnvonneumann_fellowship.html/

[SC2 Jobs] Scientist for the development of VASP

By | SC2 jobs

Job Description

The Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) group seeks one scientist for the development of the software package VASP . VASP is a de facto standard for the simulation of condensed matter systems using the Schroedinger equation. A very exciting and lively working environment with many collaborative research projects involving theory as well as experimental groups is offered. The work will cover VASP software maintenance and support, optimization of the existing codes for latest high performance computer architectures (e.g. Intel Xeon, Nvidia GPU), cutting edge theory developments as enumerated below, as well as co-development of workflow tools (ASE, AiiDA, pymatgen, etc.)

Requirements

  • PhD in physics or chemistry
  • Excellent record in any area of computational solid state physics or chemistry. The areas of expertise can include – but are not restricted to – density functional theory, many-body Green’s function techniques, quantum field theoretical methods, quantum chemistry methods, or modeling of condensed matter systems.
  • Candidates with proven expertise in developing new computational methods and adapting them to high performance computers will be given preference.
  • Prior knowledge of VASP is advantageously but not strictly required.

Location

Vienna, Austria

To apply:

i) CV including full academic record,
ii) list of publications and talks including two reprints representative of previous research,
iii) expression of interest concerning research area(s) and previous expertise (one page).

Applications need to be sent to georg.kresse_at_univie.ac.at (topic: Scientific software developer).

Selection of candidates will start immediately and continue until the  positions are filled. The contract will be for one year initially, with the  possibility for a permanent contract after positive evaluation.

 

Sincerely,
The VASP team

[SC2 Jobs] Paid summer internship with ARC-TS and Science Gateways Community Institute

By | SC2 jobs

Hands-on work experiences for undergraduate and graduate students

The Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) Workforce Development team is looking for a summer intern interested in developing their gateway development skills. Eligible applicants include graduate students majoring in computer science or computer engineering (or related fields) at any level and undergraduates majoring in computer science or computer engineering (or related fields) who have completed their junior year and who demonstrate strong programming and software engineering skills.

Location: University of Michigan at ARC-TS offices (Central Campus)
Stipend: $500/week
Contact: Brock Palen at brockp@umich.edu ASAP

Interns will be required to attend the Gateways 2018 conference, for which SGCI Workforce Development will provide funding. Attending PEARC18 is recommended, but not required. Funding will be provided by SGCI Workforce Development to interns who decide to attend.

More information at sciencegateways.org/engage/internships *Note that even though the website says the application window is closed, ARC-TS still has a position opened.

2016-2017 MICDE Research Snapshot

By | Research

2016-2017 has been a year of sustained growth for MICDE’s research portfolio. The number of faculty affiliated with the institute stands at 130, spanning 30 departments and eight schools and colleges. The Center for Scientific Software Infrastructure was established to bring together the U-M community engaged in developing open scientific software. It will focus on establishing best practices for developing, disseminating and documenting scientific software in the public domain. Led by Prof. Emanuel Gull (Physics), the Center aims to provide training and support for researchers that are ready to transform their research codes into well-engineered software. It offers grant support in the form of programmers, consultants, and administrative assistance. It includes a portal to share your code with the research community at large.

MICDE’s two established centers, the Center for Network and Storage-Enabled Collaborative Computational Science (CNSECCS) and the Center for Data-Driven Computational Physics (DaCoP), each held their first symposium, showcasing their first year of research activities. This included evidence of the growing reach of OSiRIS, the open framework for storage, computation and collaboration against big scientific data, and the first results from ConFlux, U-M’s groundbreaking computing cluster for data-driven computational physics. These results have been presented at several conferences, and are appearing in the leading computational journals.

Vorticity field at a late time in the evolution of an elliptic vortex patch computed by a Lagrangian particle method with remeshing and treecode-accelerated evaluation of the Biot-Savart integral. (source: Ling Xu)

MICDE also funded its first round of Catalyst Grants, that are supporting four innovative computational science research projects. Research funded by the Catalyst Grants is breaking new ground, while helping define the future of computational science. This research consists of:

  • studies of the neuronal dynamics of learning and memory formation;
  • new algorithms for the complex, nonlinear dynamics of power grids;
  • novel integral equations methods using recent advances in numerical analysis;  
  • and probabilistic computational frameworks for rare but often catastrophic events.

The past academic year MICDE hosted 14 external speakers with backgrounds and research concentrations that span the breadth of computational science of today and the future. The series culminated in MICDE’s annual symposium: “The New Era of Data-Enabled Computational Science,” which featured talks by worldwide leaders in computational science, including U-M faculty. The symposium included a student poster competition with over 50 entries.

Dr. Ann Almgren from the Lawrence Livermore National Lab speaking about Next Generation AMR, part of the 2016-2017 MICDE Seminar Series

MICDE faculty are committed to growing the already strong U-M community of computational scientists. Over the past year, as before, we have organized a number of workshops to foster collaboration and put together interdisciplinary teams in response to funding calls from federal agencies and foundations.   MICDE offers faculty teams institutional support and direct links to our excellent educational programs as well as cyberinfrastructure, all of which strengthen faculty proposals. With the backing of our parent unit, Advanced Research Computing (ARC), and its technical and consulting services (ARC-Technology Services, and Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research), this effort has raised over $22M in external funding over the past 2 years. This includes support from federal agencies (NSF, NIH, and DOD), as well as from industry.  We also work with the academic units at U-M to identify compelling new areas for recruiting the type of faculty members who will drive computational science in the future.

 

2016-2017 Education Snapshot

By | Educational, General Interest, News

Over the past year, MICDE’s educational programs and activities have experienced tremendous growth. The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering currently has 50 students enrolled, spanning 19 departments from 5 different schools and colleges. Sixteen students graduated within the last academic year, and 44 have graduated since the Graduate Certificate was established in 2013. Even further, the number of women in the program went from zero in 2014 to 15 currently enrolled.

The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing has experienced extraordinary growth, with 74 students enrolled from 20 departments, and four schools or colleges. We added a section to our web site with both programs’ alumni information.

We are working to broaden as well as to deepen the activities and resources available to students in both programs. Twenty MICDE fellowships were awarded this academic year to students in our programs. We continued to sponsor student software teams at competitions, as well as individual students presenting their work at leading conferences. On-campus, MICDE student activities include networking lunches, and the Scientific Computing Student Club (SC2). On the programmatic front, our non-engineering students now have access to a CAEN account that gives them more options to connect and use U-M High Performance Computing resources. Relevant grant opportunities for students are tracked and updated in MICDE’s grant webpage

2016-2017 MICDE Fellow Yuxi Chen (ClaSp) presenting his work at the MICDE Annual Symposium

Several educational projects and initiatives are afoot at MICDE, including a Massively Open Online Class (MOOC) in Computational Thinking targeting both high school students and their teachers. This MOOC aims to introduce learners to algorithmic approaches to problems. This initiative is being developed in collaboration with the School of Education, the office of Academic Innovation, and with input from a number of high schools in the Detroit Metropolitan Area.The two new courses launched by MICDE faculty last year, Methods and Practices of Scientific Computing, and Data-Driven Analysis and Modeling of Complex Systems, were successful in their first offerings during the 2016-2017 academic year, and are being offered again in 2017-2018. Other teams of MICDE faculty are at work across campus to develop new courses in computational science.

2016-2017 Outreach and Industrial Engagement Snapshot

By | General Interest

2017 miRcore’s GIDAS Biotechnology Summer Camp participants

Community Outreach

MICDE remains committed to advancing the understanding of science in general, and computational science in particular, in the community. To this end we have continued our support of internal and external organizations. Externally, our ongoing support of the non profit science outreach group, miRcore, included running MICDE sponsored compute cycles on Flux for high school students participating in miRcore’s computational biology summer camps through their student network called GIDAS. We also continued to support the undergraduate Biosoftware Team that has competed in the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) year competition for the past five years. The team participates in the software track aimed for computer scientists and developers to nurture their knowledge of biology, and for computational biologists, bioinformaticians and biologists to enhance their aptitude for building software. Over the past couple of years, the team has been developing ProtoCat, a software developed to address the issue of reproducibility in synthetic biology. It is a collaborative platform on which researchers share their experiment protocols and users can customize them to meet their own needs. For the third year in a row, the team returned with a gold medal.

2017 BioSoftware Team

Internally, less than two years since its inception, the Scientific Computing Student Club (SC2) has established several activities that complement the formal training in computational science available at U-M, including through MICDE’s PhD in Scientific Computing, and Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering. Over the past year, the SC2 had his own invited speakers, organized tours to the Flux facility and the U-M 3D Lab, organized the first Visualization Challenge, co-sponsored by NVIDIA, and just recently added a section on its web page for academic and non-academic job opportunities. During the 2017 Fall Term, SC2 students ran a weekly Machine Learning Collaborative Workshop, and the group is planning a hands-on series on code parallelization.

Industrial Engagement

We continue working towards increasing our engagement with industry. Over the last two years, in addition to NVIDIA, MICDE has established partnerships with IBM, through the joint design and development of our computer cluster, ConFlux, and with Toyota Research Institute, through a funded project on scientific software for materials research. We are now working in partnership with the U-M Business Engagement Center to create an MICDE industrial affiliates program, which will provide many additional avenues for interaction between our students or faculty and industry.

 

 

 

The University of Michigan is live on IBM.com

By | News, Research

IBM is showcasing the current research developed with ConFlux, our ground-breaking cluster that uses IBM’s HPC and storage technology to enable scientists to draw on huge volumes of bid data and use machine learning to create reliable models for compute-intensive research.

“ With IBM hardware boosting our HPC environment, we can offer scientists the tools to conduct research that could revolutionize entire industries. ”
Todd Raeker, Research Technology Consultant for the University of Michigan.

To learn more please visit http://www-03.ibm.com/software/businesscasestudies/us/en/corp?synkey=A323848E50678F66

 

NVIDIA Grad Fellowship applications are open for the 2018-2019 academic year

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities

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NVIDIA just launched their 17th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program for the 2018-2019 academic year, which advances the frontiers of science by awarding grants and providing technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research. If you are or know of a student that uses ConFlux, please encourage them to apply as very few people have access to the types of GPUS available on Conflux, which might make their application more competitive.

This year they are especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in AI, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. NVIDIA’s Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2018-2019 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 140 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts. More importantly, this funding has helped some students achieve major breakthroughs in their research – breakthroughs that may not have been possible without additional funding.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. There is a new submission portal, and the deadlines for submissions are Dec. 13, 2017 (nomination letters) and Dec. 15, 2017 (applications). Students should be sure to start their application process early, as they use the portal to request their nomination letters in advance.

Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering, or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/graduate-fellowships or email fellowship@nvidia.com.