Carlos Aguilar

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The schematic is a series of muscle images during the regenerative process, whereby resident stem cells repair the tissue.

Skeletal muscle contains multiple cell types, regenerates when damaged via a pool of resident stem cells (called satellite cells), consumes significant amounts of metabolic energy, grows and adapts its structure and function based on its environment. Nearly all actions in life are defined by the coordinated actions of skeletal muscle but when afflicted by injury or aging, muscle function decreases and quality of life is reduced. Currently, there are little to no therapies for recovery after severe trauma or age-associated muscle wasting (sarcopenia). Prof. Aguilar’s laboratory focuses on studying molecular mechanisms satellite cells use after trauma and aging with a particular focus on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. We develop and utilize different types of high-throughput sequencing based assays and sophisticated bioinformatics algorithms to generate these insights.

Albert S. Berahas

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Albert S. Berahas is an Assistant Professor of Industrial & Operations Engineering. Dr. Berahas received a BSC in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering from Cornell University, and his MSC and Ph.D.degrees in Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics from Northwestern University. Before coming to the University of Michigan, Dr. Berahas held positions as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Lehigh University and at Northwestern University.

Dr. Berahas’ research broadly focuses on designing, developing and analyzing algorithms for solving large scale nonlinear optimization problems. Such problems are ubiquitous, and arise in a plethora of areas such as engineering design, economics, transportation, robotics, machine learning and statistics. Specifically, he is interested in and has explored several sub-fields of nonlinear optimization such as: (i) general nonlinear optimization algorithms, (ii) optimization algorithms for machine learning, (iii) constrained optimization, (iv) stochastic optimization, (v) derivative-free optimization, and (vi) distributed optimization.

Yafeng Yin

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Yafeng Yin is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He investigates critical issues associated with the design, operations, regulation, and management of innovative mobility services and systems. The goal is to support them in becoming integral components of transportation systems, improving system connections and integration, yielding efficient and multimodal mobility of people and goods, and enhancing rural underserved communities’ access to employment, education and other lifeline opportunities. He is focus on understanding the interaction between travelers, transportation modes and infrastructure, and then modeling the consequence of the interaction. With the model established, he then investigates how to optimize the design and operations of transportation systems. In his work, he often needs to solve large-scale optimization models.

Steven Skerlos

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Steven Skerlos is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Mechanical Engineering and a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is the director of the U-M program in Sustainable Engineering and co-director of the Engineering Sustainable Systems Program. His research focus is on the design of technology systems to reduce environmental impact while advancing economic and societal objectives. His group works on environmental and sustainable technology systems, life cycle product design optimization and sustainable water and wastewater systems, among other topics. From designing humanitarian technologies to purifying water using anaerobic membrane reactors, Prof. Skerlos research addresses challenges in the fields of systems design, technology selection, manufacturing, and water.

Sustainable Technology Policy Maximizing the cost-effectiveness of pollution elimination eastlab.org

Sustainable Technology Policy
Maximizing the cost-effectiveness of pollution elimination (eastlab.org)

Brendan Kochunas

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Brendan Kochunas is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science. Dr. Kochunas work focus on high performance computing methods, especially parallel algorithms for the 3D Boltmann Transport Equation. He is the lead developer and primary author of the MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characterstics based Transport) code. Currently, leading the development of MPACT and its application within CASL (www.casl.gov) constitutes his research activities.

Dr. Kochunas is the lead instructor of MICDE course Methods and Practice of Scientific Computing. He has created a novel and integrated class curriculum that immerse U-M students in many HPC tools and resources, and teaches them to effectively use these in scientific computing research.

George Alter

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George Alter is Research Professor at ICPSR and the Population Studies Center and Professor of History at the University of Michigan. His research grows out of interests in the history of the family, demography, and economic history, and recent projects have examined the effects of early life conditions on health in old age and new ways of describing fertility transitions. He is also involved in international efforts to promote research transparency and data sharing.

Silas Alben

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Silas Alben is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics, and the Director of the Applied & Interdisciplinary Mathematics program. He uses theoretical analysis, and develops numerical methods and models of problems arising from biology, especially biomechanics and engineering. Some of his group’s current applications are piezoelectric flags, flag fluttering in inviscid channel flow, snake locomotion and jet-propelled swimming.

Equilibrium configurations of actuated bilayers with general initial shapes. S. Alben, Adv. Comp. Math., 2014

Equilibrium configurations of actuated bilayers with general initial shapes. S. Alben, Adv. Comp. Math., 2014

Gregory Hulbert

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Gregory Hulbert is a Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering. His research involves computational mechanics, structural dynamics, flexible multibody dynamics, dynamic response of composites and vehicle dynamics using finite element methods. He is also involved in the engineering education of mechanics.

Dominika Zgid

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Dominika Zgid is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and in the Department of Physics. Her group bridges the fields of chemistry, physics and material sciences seeking to explain and predict the electronic movement in finite molecular systems and infinite crystalline materials. They develop new theoretical approaches that will advance current theoretical tools in chemistry that can be applied to a variety of industrial applications.

Daniel Forger

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Daniel Forger is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. He is devoted to understanding biological clocks. He uses techniques from many fields, including computer simulation, detailed mathematical modeling and mathematical analysis, to understand biological timekeeping. His research aims to generate predictions that can be experimentally verified.