Tentative Schedule

New Paradigms in Computing

Thurs., April 9, 2020 | 4th Floor Rackham Building (915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor)

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8:00 A.M. — REGISTRATION OPENS

Light breakfast items and coffee

8:45 A.M. — MICDE: A YEAR IN REVIEW, DIRECTOR KRISHNA GARIKIPATI

krishnaGarikipati

Krishna Garikipati
Director, Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics
University of Michigan

WHITE SPACE

WHITE SPACE

9:00 A.M. — IAN FOSTER, DATA SCIENCE AND LEARNING DIVISION DIRECTOR, ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY

Learning Systems for science

New learning technologies seem likely to transform much of science, as they are already doing for many areas of industry and society. We can expect these technologies to be used, for example, to obtain new insights from massive scientific data and to automate research processes. However, success in such endeavors will require new learning systems: scientific computing platforms, methods, and software that enable the large-scale application of learning technologies. These systems will need to enable learning from extremely large quantities of data; the management of large and complex data, models, and workflows; and the delivery of learning capabilities to many thousands of scientists. In this talk, I review these challenges and opportunities and describe systems that my colleagues and I are developing to enable the application of learning throughout the research process, from data acquisition to analysis.


Ian Foster
Professor, Computer Science
University of Chicago
Division Director, Data Science and Learning Division
Argonne National Laboratory

Bio: Ian Foster is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. Foster received his undergraduate degree in computer science from the University of Canterbury and a PhD in computer science from Imperial College in London. Foster is also the Division Director for the Data Science and Learning Division at Argonne National Laboratory. From 2006 to 2016, he was director of the Computation Institute (CI), a joint project between the University of Chicago, and Argonne National Laboratory. Among his many achievements, is the Gordon Bell Prize that he won in 2001. In his research, he seeks to develop tools and techniques that allow people to use high-performance computing technologies to do qualitatively new things. This involves investigations of parallel and distributed languages, algorithms, and communication; and also focused work on applications. He is particularly interested in using high-performance networking to incorporate remote compute and information resources into local computational environments.


9:40 A.M. — CATALYST PROJECTS Session I

Talk information – progress update

10:50 A.M. — EWA DEELMAN, INFORMATION SCIENCES INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

The Pegasus Workflow Management System: Evolution and Impact

The Pegasus Workflow Management System is designed to meet the needs of a wide variety of scientific applications. It automates the execution of complex and large-scale workflow task graphs operating on large amounts of data. Since 2001 Pegasus has been working with a number of applications such as LIGO, the gravitational-wave physics experiment, to enable them to accomplish their scientific goals. In 2016, Pegasus was used by LIGO to analyze their experimental data, confirming the first ever direct detection of a gravitational wave. Pegasus also delivers robust automation capabilities to researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) studying seismic phenomena, to astronomers seeking to understand the structure of the universe, to material scientists developing new drug delivery methods, and to students seeking to understand human population migration. An example of societal impact is SCEC’s use of Pegasus to generate the world’s first physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard map that provides insight into why earthquakes in the Los Angeles basin can be so destructive. This information can inform civil engineering practices in the area. This talk focuses on the current Pegasus capabilities and the applications that rely on it to advance science.


Ewa Deelman
Research Professor
Research Director
Information Sciences Institute
University of Southern California

Bio: Ewa Deelman is a Research Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Southern California. She is also the Principal Research Scientist at the USC Information Sciences Institute. Deelman received her undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Wells College, a master’s in Computer Science from State University (SUNY) at New Patlz, and a PhD in Computer Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She has co-edited a book on scientific workflows: Workflows for e-Science: Scientific Workflows for Grids, Ian J. Taylor, Ewa Deelman, Dennis B. Gannon, Matthew Shields (Editors), Springer, 2007., and authored over 30 journal articles and 80 conference publications. Her main area of research is distributed computing. Deelman researches how to best support complex scientific applications on a variety of computational environments, including campus clusters, grids, and clouds. She has designed new algorithms for job scheduling, resource provisioning, and data storage optimization in the context of scientific workflows.


11:30 A.M. — CATALYST PROJECTS SESSION II

Talk information – progress update

12:00 P.M. — LUNCH AND POSTER SESSION

Lunch

Please RSVP if you are planning on attending lunch.

Poster Session

Students and post-docs will be available to talk to you about their posters from 12:00 – 2:25 p.m.

2:30 P.M. — REMARKS, BRADFORD ORR, ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH

Bradford Orr
U-M Associate Vice President for Research
Professor of Physics
University of Michigan

 

SPACESPACE


4:50 P.M. — ANNOUNCEMENT OF WINNING POSTERS AND CLOSING REMARKS

Poster competition winners will be announce.

5:00 P.M. — RESILIENT CITIES THROUGH COMPUTATION WORKSHOP'S HACKATHON

HACKATHON: CREATING A HYBRID SIMULATION SYSTEM USING THE SIMPLE RUN TIME INFRASTRUCTURE SOFTWARE

5:00 – 9:00 p.m. | Rackham West Conference Room (4th Floor)

Dinner is provided.

Smart cityscape with wireless network. Futuristic communication technology concept.

The SRTI (‘Simple Run-Time Infrastructure’) is a software toolkit meant to act as middleware for simulators and applications across different languages to share data with each other, with the primary goal of being user-friendly.

This workshop will introduce the SRTI, and provide a template project consisting of multiple simulators, each with a specialized purpose, relating to a natural-disaster scenario. Participants will need to replace one of the simulators with their own (in a supported programming language of their choice) to improve the outcome of a virtual-agent’s survival. Participants will need to bring their own laptops to take part. The Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is required to run the SRTI. Please refer to https://icor.engin.umich.edu/ for more information on supported operating systems and languages.

The event is open to students and post-doctoral fellows from any school/institution. Basic coding experience is required. Individuals or teams of 2 people may compete.

Prizse: $750 for 1st place, $500 for 2nd place and $250 for 3rd place

Visit https://icor.engin.umich.edu/ for more information.

                                                                         Sponsored by the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

Resilient Cities through Computation Workshop

Fri., April 10, 2020 | 4th Floor Rackham Building (915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor)

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8:30 A.M. — REGISTRATION OPENS

Light breakfast items and coffee

9:00 A.M. — OPENING REMARKS, SHERIF EL-TAWIL, PROFESSOR, CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Sherif El-Tawil
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Michigan

SPACE

SPACE


9:05 A.M. — THERESE MCALLISTER, COMMUNITY RESILIENCE GROUP LEADER AND PROGRAM MANAGER, NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

TALK TITLE

Abstract


Therese McAllister
Community Resilience Group Leader
Program Manager
National Institute of Standards of Technology (NIST)

 

SPACESPACE


9:30 A.M. — WORKSHOP SESSION I

TALK TITLE

Abstract


Sherif El-Tawil
Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Michigan

Bio: Sherif El-Tawil is a Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. El-Tawil received his undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering from Cairo University, a master’s in Structural Engineering from Cario University, and a PhD in Civil Engineering from Cornell University. His research explores how buildings and bridges behave under the extreme loading conditions generated by manmade and natural hazards. He is particularly interested in how structural systems respond when subjected to seismic excitation, collision by heavy objects, and blast. El-Tawil is actively investigating how to utilize new materials and technologies to create innovative structural systems that mitigate the potentially catastrophic effects of extreme loading. Much of his research is focused on the computational and theoretical aspects of structural engineering, with particular emphasis on computational simulation, grid computing technology, finite element analysis, constitutive modeling, macro-plasticity formulations, nonlinear solution techniques and visualization methods.


TALK TITLE

Abstract


Richard Rood
Professor
Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
University of Michigan

Bio: Richard Rood is a Professor in the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering at the University of Michigan. Rood received his undergraduate degree in Physics from the University of North Carolina, a master’s and PhD in Meteorology from Florida State University. His primary research interests are on climate change problem solving. He contributes to research projects on numerical algorithms with his collaborations. He is also active as a consultant to NOAA on their modeling activities and the Next Generation Global Prediction System.


10:40 A.M. — WORKSHOP SESSION II

TALK TITLE

Abstract


Seymour Spence
Assistant Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Michigan

Bio: Seymour Spence is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Spence received his master’s  from the University of Perugia and a PhD from the University of Florence and TU Braunschweig. His main research interests lie in the areas of performance-based wind engineering, system-level analysis and optimization of uncertain dynamic systems, probabilistic modeling and uncertainty propagation, metamodeling of static and dynamic systems, machine learning in stochastic analysis of structures, resilience and adaptation of communities subject to severe wind events, distributing computing frameworks for infrastructure systems, topology optimization of uncertain stochastic systems, computational fluid dynamics for wind and rain simulation. In addition, he is interested in expanding my research to hybrid data/physical computational modeling, decision frameworks based on social wellness, and computational modeling of wild fires at the interface of urban communities.

12:25 P.M. — LUNCH

Please RSVP if you are planning on attending lunch.

Hackathon winners will be announced at lunch.