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Most CSCAR workshops will be free for the U-M community starting in January 2019

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

Beginning in January of 2019, most of CSCAR’s workshops will be offered free of charge to UM students, faculty, and staff.

CSCAR is able to do this thanks to funding from UM’s Data Science Initiative.  Registration for CSCAR workshops is still required, and seats are limited.

CSCAR requests that participants please cancel their registration if they decide not to attend a workshop for which they have previously registered.

Note that a small number of workshops hosted by CSCAR but taught by non-CSCAR personnel will continue to have a fee, and fees will continue to apply for people who are not UM students, faculty or staff.

U-M approves new graduate certificate in computational neuroscience

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The new Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience will help bridge the gap between experimentally focused studies and quantitative modeling and analysis, giving graduate students a chance to broaden their skill sets in the diversifying field of brain science.

“The broad, practical training provided in this certificate program will help prepare both quantitatively focused and lab-based students for the increasingly cross-disciplinary job market in neuroscience,” said Victoria Booth, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, who will oversee the program.

To earn the certificate, students will be required to take core computational neuroscience courses and cross-disciplinary courses outside of their home departments; participate in a specialized interdisciplinary journal club; and complete a practicum.

Cross-discplinary courses will depend on a student’s focus: students in experimental neuroscience programs will take quantitative coursework, and students in quantitative science programs such as physics, biophysics, mathematics and engineering will take neuroscience coursework.

The certificate was approved this fall, and will be jointly administered by the Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) and the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE).

For more information, visit micde.umich.edu/comput-neuro-certificate. Enrollment is not yet open, but information sessions will be scheduled early next year. Please register for the program’s mailing list if you’re interested.

Along with the Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience, U-M offers several other graduate programs aimed at training students in computational and data-intensive science, including:

  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which is focused on quantitative and computing techniques that can be applied broadly to all sciences.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which specializes in statistical and computational methods required to analyze large data sets.
  • The Ph.D in Scientific Computing, intended for students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their doctoral studies. This degree is awarded jointly with an existing program, so that a student receives, for example, a Ph.D in Aerospace engineering and Scientific Computing.

 

U-M awarded a Clare Boothe Luce grant for fellowships to support women in STEM

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The Clare Boothe Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation has awarded a $270,000 grant to the University of Michigan. The funding will support women PhD students through the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE). The program aims to encourage women “to enter, study, graduate and teach” in science, and the funding will support women PhD students who make use of computational science in their research.

“We’re very excited to be able to promote women in scientific computing,” said Mariana Carrasco-Teja, manager of the grant and Associate Director of MICDE. “These resources generously provided by the Clare Boothe Luce program will make a huge difference in the careers of women pursuing computational science at U-M.”

For details on applying, and fellowship requirements, see the fellowship page at micde.umich.edu/academic-programs/cbl/.

The fellowships carry a $35,000 annual stipend and tuition, among other benefits. They will be awarded to students applying for PhD programs in fall 2019 in the College of Engineering, or several programs in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts (Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics, Applied Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Earth & Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics).

The CBL program at U-M is funded by the Clare Boothe Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation, with additional support from the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, the College of Engineering, the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, and MICDE.

MICDE announces 2018-2019 fellowship recipients

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is pleased to announce the 2018-2019 recipients of the MICDE Fellowships for students enrolled in the PhD in Scientific Computing or the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering. The fellowships, which carry a $4,000 stipend, are meant to augment other sources of funding and are available to students in both programs. See our Fellowship page for more information.

AWARDEES

Zhitong Bai, Mechanical Engineering
Kyle Bushick, Materials Science and Engineering
Geunyeong Byeon, Industrial and Operations Engineering
Sehwan Chung, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Khoi Dang, Chemistry
Sicen Du, Materials Science and Engineering
Joseph Hollowed, Physics
Jia Li, Physics
Sabrina Lynch, Biomedical Engineering
Samar Minallah, Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
Everardo Olide, Applied Physics
Shaowu Pan, Aerospace Engineering
Alicia Petersen, Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
Vyas Ramasubramani, Chemical Engineering
Fabricio Vasselai, Political Science
Nathan Vaughn, Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics
Blair Winograd, Chemistry
Samuel Young, Chemical Engineering
Kexin Zhang, Chemistry
Bu Zhao, School of Environment and Sustainability

New course for fall 2018: On-Ramp to Data Science for Chemical Engineers

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

Description: Engineers are encountering and generating a ever-growing body of data and recognizing the utility of applying data science (DataSci) approaches to extract knowledge from that data. A common barrier to learning DataSci is the stack of prerequisite courses that cannot fit into the typical engineering student schedule. This class will remove this barrier by, in one semester, covering essential foundational concepts that are not part of many engineering disciplines’ core curricula. These include: good programming practices, data structures, linear algebra, numerical methods, algorithms, probability, and statistics. The class’s focus will be on how these topics relate to data science and to provide context for further self-study.

Eligibility: College of Engineering students, pending instructor approval.

More information: http://myumi.ch/LzqPq

Instructor: Heather Mayes, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering, hbmayes@umich.edu.

HPC training workshops begin Tuesday, Feb. 13

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held Feb. 12 through March 6, 2018, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS).

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Tuesday, Feb. 13, 1 – 4 p.m. (full descriptionregistration)
• Friday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration)

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Monday, Feb. 19, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Tuesday, March 6, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, and a brief introduction to scientific computing with Python, among other topics.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Wednesday, Feb. 21, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Friday, Feb. 23, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

Hadoop and Spark workshop
Learn how to process large amounts (up to terabytes) of data using SQL and/or simple programming models available in Python, R, Scala, and Java.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Thursday, Feb. 22, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

2016-2017 Education Snapshot

By | Educational, General Interest, News

Over the past year, MICDE’s educational programs and activities have experienced tremendous growth. The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering currently has 50 students enrolled, spanning 19 departments from 5 different schools and colleges. Sixteen students graduated within the last academic year, and 44 have graduated since the Graduate Certificate was established in 2013. Even further, the number of women in the program went from zero in 2014 to 15 currently enrolled.

The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing has experienced extraordinary growth, with 74 students enrolled from 20 departments, and four schools or colleges. We added a section to our web site with both programs’ alumni information.

We are working to broaden as well as to deepen the activities and resources available to students in both programs. Twenty MICDE fellowships were awarded this academic year to students in our programs. We continued to sponsor student software teams at competitions, as well as individual students presenting their work at leading conferences. On-campus, MICDE student activities include networking lunches, and the Scientific Computing Student Club (SC2). On the programmatic front, our non-engineering students now have access to a CAEN account that gives them more options to connect and use U-M High Performance Computing resources. Relevant grant opportunities for students are tracked and updated in MICDE’s grant webpage

2016-2017 MICDE Fellow Yuxi Chen (ClaSp) presenting his work at the MICDE Annual Symposium

Several educational projects and initiatives are afoot at MICDE, including a Massively Open Online Class (MOOC) in Computational Thinking targeting both high school students and their teachers. This MOOC aims to introduce learners to algorithmic approaches to problems. This initiative is being developed in collaboration with the School of Education, the office of Academic Innovation, and with input from a number of high schools in the Detroit Metropolitan Area.The two new courses launched by MICDE faculty last year, Methods and Practices of Scientific Computing, and Data-Driven Analysis and Modeling of Complex Systems, were successful in their first offerings during the 2016-2017 academic year, and are being offered again in 2017-2018. Other teams of MICDE faculty are at work across campus to develop new courses in computational science.

Reading and discussion group:  Data science in understanding and addressing climate change 

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings

CSCAR announces a reading and discussion group Data science in understanding and addressing climate change that will meet on the third or fourth (depending on the preferences of participants) Friday of every month between 3 and 5 pm. We will discuss reports and significant papers that illuminate fundamental issues in climate change science, policy, and management. The suggested format at this stage is that we discuss one science and one policy (or management) paper or chapter. The focus will be on the spatial (and temporal) dimensions of the issue and we will concentrate more on methods and techniques keeping the requirement for domain knowledge relatively low. We will lay emphasis on the conceptual part of the tools and techniques so that it is accessible to a wider set of participants, but will also get into the technical details.

This is an effort to bring people involved in climate change together from a data science perspective. The idea is to learn together in a fun environment and foster dialogue with a focus on how data science can provide the common ground for mutual learning and understanding.

 We will meet in Rackham, but we will be open to rotating the location. You will be able to participate remotely, if you choose to.

 If you are interested send an email to Manish Verma at manishve@umich.edu

 If you have any suggestion for discussion and reading let us know.  We will include chapters from the IPCC and US global change science programs in our discussion.

CSCAR provides walk-in support for new Flux users

By | Data, Educational, Flux, General Interest, HPC, News

CSCAR now provides walk-in support during business hours for students, faculty, and staff seeking assistance in getting started with the Flux computing environment.  CSCAR consultants can walk a researcher through the steps of applying for a Flux account, installing and configuring a terminal client, connecting to Flux, basic SSH and Unix command line, and obtaining or accessing allocations.  

In addition to walk-in support, CSCAR has several staff consultants with expertise in advanced and high performance computing who can work with clients on a variety of topics such as installing, optimizing, and profiling code.  

Support via email is also provided via hpc-support@umich.edu.  

CSCAR is located in room 3550 of the Rackham Building (915 E. Washington St.). Walk-in hours are from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for noon – 1 p.m. on Tuesdays.

See the CSCAR web site (cscar.research.umich.edu) for more information.